body pains vs. body aches

thelastbattle

Senior Member
Korean
Hello,

Today's question is about body pains or body aches.

One of my clients called and said that she could not attend the facility which I work for because of her multiple body pains or multiple body aches.

Please, let me know which phrase I should use in the sentence.

Thank you,
 
  • velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I can't really envisage what might have been wrong with her. Does multiple body pains have any special meaning in your language, thelastbattle?

    I'd probably just say "...because she was in too much pain" - unless "multiple body pains/aches" has some special significance. It doesn't sound natural in English.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    We do talk about "aches and pains", but it sounds to me a little trivial as an excuse for not going somewhere.
     

    thelastbattle

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Hello, velisarius
    Regarding your question "Does multiple body pains have any special meaning in your language, thelastbattle?"

    I mean that some of my clients complain that they feel pains in his/her whole body (They are over 80 years old.)
    You said that I can use "She/He is in too much pain."
    I think I can use the sentence you wrote.
    Thank velisarius and all others who gave me advice.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Thank you for giving more context.

    I think a very old person is entitled to complain of a lack of mobility due to generalised aches and pains.
    A younger person's "aches and pains" would hardly prevent them from going somewhere.

    One of my clients called and said that she could not attend the facility which I work for, because of multiple aches and pains.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    There are a number of chronic pains/aches syndromes which younger people can suffer from, and which could prevent people keeping appointments or going places if the condition is not well-controlled or flaring. Passing infections can involve aches and pains as part of the inflammatory process.
    Muscle ache and pains are known as myalgias and joint aches and pains are called arthralgias.

    Benny's suggestion of 'diffuse', all over, is excellent. We can dispense with 'body' or 'bodily': 'aches and pains' is all that's needed.
    If that's how the woman described her condition, she did the best she could. It's irrelevant whether she was telling the truth or not.
     
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