boil vs. cook rice

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Encolpius

Senior Member
Hungarian
Hello, do you boil or cook rice? And do you see any difference between those two verbs in that context? Are they interchangeable? Thanks.
 
  • Cenzontle

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    When it's time to prepare rice, I say "I'm going to cook some rice."
    Boiling is the only way I cook rice, so it's understood.
    If I said "I'm going to boil some rice", people would wonder if I had other ways to cook it and had to specify boiling.
     

    Copperknickers

    Senior Member
    Scotland - Scots and English
    It is a slightly complicated subject because rice was not traditionally part of British or American cuisine until recently (and most people in the UK and USA do not know how to cook rice to this day, they use it ready cooked). But there are various ways of cooking rice, depending on the cuisine.

    1. Boiling it in a covered saucepan (Indian and Chinese primarily)

    2. Steaming it in a rice cooker or traditional steaming vessel (Primarily China and Japan)

    3. Frying it and then boiling it (India, China and Southeast Asia primarily)

    4. Baking it (Spanish way)

    5. Simmering with stock (Italian way)


    1 boiled rice (may also be called steamed rice by some East Asians)

    2 steamed rice

    3 fried rice

    4 Paella

    5 Risotto.


    All are cooked rice. I hope this makes everything clear.
     

    Encolpius

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    It is a slightly complicated subject because rice was not traditionally part of British or American cuisine until recently (and most people in the UK and USA do not know how to cook rice to this day, they use it ready cooked). ...
    Fantastic and interesting comment, thank you.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I don't know what you mean by this. :confused: We've been cooking rice for generations. Two of my great-uncles had rice farms.
    As Myridon points out, we not only eat a lot of rice and have done so for generations, but produce a lot of it as well.

    And, the best place around here to find pre-cooked rice is in the Asian-food grocery stores. :rolleyes:
     

    djweaverbeaver

    Senior Member
    NYC
    English Atlanta, GA USA
    Yes,

    Copperknickers is wrong with his comment. Rice production has been a part of American history since the colonial days. In the Antebellum South, rice plantations were big business off the coasts of Georgia and South Carolina. After the Civil War and slavery was abolished, rice production all but ceased there and moved to other parts of the country. The United States is still one of the world's top exporters of rice. We may not eat it every day or with every meal as is done in some countries, but people definitely know how to boil/cook rice. I am a native Georgian, and I'd have to say that I've grown up saying to boil rice more than to cook it, mostly because we made it by boiling it in water.
     
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