Boil vs get boiled

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Ragneda

Senior Member
Russian
Hi! Can we say “get boiled” about soup?

If you don’t lift the lid of a pan, the soup gets boiled faster.
 
  • Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    No. The soup doesn't become boiled (and stay that way). It boils then it stops. After it is cold, there's no fundamental change to the liquid part of the soup. If there are potatoes in the soup, you have cold boiled potatoes and cold soup.
    If you turn up the heat, the meat gets cooked faster. Even after it cools down, the meat is cooked, not raw.
     

    Ragneda

    Senior Member
    Russian
    No. The soup doesn't become boiled (and stay that way). It boils then it stops. After it is cold, there's no fundamental change to the liquid part of the soup. If there are potatoes in the soup, you have cold boiled potatoes and cold soup.
    If you turn up the heat, the meat gets cooked faster. Even after it cools down, the meat is cooked, not raw.
    So, it’s better to say: “the soup boils faster”?
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Yes, we say the soup boils. We would be very unlikely to use either form of the passive: :thumbsdown: it was boiled, :thumbsdown: it got boiled.
     

    srk

    Senior Member
    English - US
    So, it’s better to say: “the soup boils faster”?
    I would know what you mean, but "boils faster"* is used to say that the water boils more violently. I'd say "The soup comes to a boil sooner."

    *From Step by Step Cooking Chinese, Marshall Cavendish International Asia Pte Ltd:
    "High heat is used for producing a fast boil, where the water or liquid is kept bubbling ...."​
    "Medium heat is used for keeping liquids at a moderate boil ...."​
     
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