Boil vs Is Boilled

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  • sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    When water boils pour it. = Pour the boiling water into or onto something.

    When water is boiled pour it. - There's no indication of precisely when the water might have been boiled.

    >>Which one would you use in a recipe?<<

    Recipe for what? I don't think you would add boiling water to a cake recipe.
     

    srknpower

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    When water boils pour it. = Pour the boiling water into or onto something.

    When water is boiled pour it. - There's no indication of precisely when the water might have been boiled.

    >>Which one would you use in a recipe?<<

    Recipe for what? I don't think you would add boiling water to a cake recipe.
    I am making coffee.

    Sorry but I didn' t get the difference between using active and passive. Is not the second one passive?
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    If you are describing how to make coffee, then "When the water boils, pour it into/onto . . . something (depending on the type of coffee you are making)."

    Or 'When the water has boiled . . . ".

    There's no difference in meaning.
     

    srknpower

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Thank you but I used the passive form of boil, I didnt mean present perfect.

    Can I use passive in this sentence?

    If you are describing how to make coffee, then "When the water boils, pour it into/onto . . . something (depending on the type of coffee you are making)."

    Or 'When the water has boiled . . . ".

    There's no difference in meaning.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    To boil is a verb that shows a change of state, There is a group of these verbs which can be used transitively or intransitively. Many of these verbs show “causative alternation.”

    Compare
    I grew the plant. (transitive)
    The plant was grown by me (transitive passive)

    The plant grew. (Intransitive)

    To boil:
    I boil the water (transitive) -> this use is known as the causative use – you cause the water to boil.
    The water is boiled by me -> (passive causative)

    The water boils (intransitive) -> this use is known as the anticausative use. In this version, “the water” is not the subject of the verb, it is “the theme participant” because the water undergoes a change.
     
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