boiling hot/scorching hot

Hese

Senior Member
German
Hello there,

is there any difference between "boiling hot" and "scorching hot"?

Could I use both to describe the weather?

"It is scorching hot out there, don't forget to take a bottle of water with you"
"It is boiling hot out there, ......."

Are both possible?

I suppose, "scorching hot" doesn't work for describing water, does it?

Don't touch the kettle, the water is boiling hot.

And for a hotplate, I would instinctively use "scorchiing hot" (or for an iron)

Don't touch the hotplate, I've just used it for cooking and it is still scorching hot.

Does my instinct serve me well?

Thank you very much!
 
  • Elwintee

    Senior Member
    England English
    Hello there,

    is there any difference between "boiling hot" and "scorching hot"?

    Could I use both to describe the weather?

    "It is scorching hot out there, don't forget to take a bottle of water with you"
    "It is boiling hot out there, ......."

    Are both possible?

    I suppose, "scorching hot" doesn't work for describing water, does it?

    Don't touch the kettle, the water is boiling hot.

    And for a hotplate, I would instinctively use "scorchiing hot" (or for an iron)

    Don't touch the hotplate, I've just used it for cooking and it is still scorching hot.

    Does my instinct serve me well?

    Thank you very much!
    I hope this observation is sufficiently relevant not to count as a new thread (because the words invariably go together): if you touch the hotplate you will be burnt, if you put your finger into boiling water it will be scalded.
     

    Hese

    Senior Member
    German
    Thank you very much for your compliment, Surikata.

    So, I can say "it's boiling hot out there" and "it's scorching hot" for the weather?

    Thanks
     

    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    Yes we do say "boiling hot", or "I'm boiling", even though we are not in hot water. Perhaps it refers to ones blood feeling as if is boiling.

    A very hot day is sometimes referred to as "a scorcher". The Sun (British tabloid newspaper) has a ready headline for articles about extremely hot days: "It's a scorcher!". This has made the description something of a comedy saying in the UK. I think "it's boiling" or "I'm boiling" is more common than "scorching" in conversation (in Britain).
     
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