bolero

  • Qcumber

    Senior Member
    UK English
    She means you are a bluffer, a deceiver! :D
    Actually it's Spanish:
    bola "1) ball,sphere; 2) lie, hoax"
    > bolero "liar, etc."
     

    Nate in California

    Senior Member
    USA, San Diego - English
    If she calls you other nice names like this one, please report them here. I am interested in these terms.

    Wait, so had you heard this term before or did you look it up? I know it's originally Spanish, but it appears to be part of Tagalog at this point as well. By the way, she says this when I say nice things to her that she doesn't believe. Anyway, I'll let you know if she uses any others.
     

    Qcumber

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Wait, so had you heard this term before or did you look it up?
    Yes it's commonly used in colloquial Tagalog. I heard it a couple of times. It's not a rare word.
    Besides it is entered (it would) in:
    ZORC, David (1991)
    Tagalog slang dictionary
    ISBN: 0-931745-56-X
     

    Camote

    Member
    Philippines
    If a woman calls me a bolero, is she calling me a kiss-ass, a liar, a smooth talker? What exactly does this word mean?

    Thanks!


    yes she is hehehe :D she's calling you a fabricator or as qcumber mentioned a deceiver.

    bolero can also be mambobola
    it literally means a baller or a person playing a ball.

    so if someone calls you a bolero or mambobolathey are like saying you're playing their heads. good job man :D
     

    WEIGAND

    Senior Member
    Spain (Madrid)
    Hello
    "Bolero" comes from the expression "decir/contar una bola" = to lie
    Bolero/a = person that tells a lie

    You can also use "trolero", that comes from "contar una trola"

    Don´t waste your time thinking whether she´s right or not: women are always right ¡ (just joking)
     

    Qcumber

    Senior Member
    UK English
    By sheer coincidence Span. > Tag. bola "lie, etc." ressembles Tag. búlà ['bu:la?] "fib, untruth", so much so that I'm pretty sure many Tagalogs confuse them.
    It must be the same with derivatives. For instance is mambobola
    1) mambobóla [mambo'bo:la] > mambu'bu:la]
    or
    2) mambubúlà [mambu'bu:la?]
    ?
     

    Camote

    Member
    Philippines
    By sheer coincidence Span. > Tag. bola "lie, etc." ressembles Tag. búlà ['bu:la?] "fib, untruth", so much so that I'm pretty sure many Tagalogs confuse them.
    It must be the same with derivatives. For instance is mambobola
    1) mambobóla [mambo'bo:la] > mambu'bu:la]
    or
    2) mambubúlà [mambu'bu:la?]
    ?

    It's mambobola. Q, bula in tagalog means bubble/s
    Yes, I think it's just a coincidence, bolero could also be "vest"
    bola = ball

    It's like saying:
    Binobola mo lang ako. = Pinapaikot mo lang ang ulo ko.
     

    Camote

    Member
    Philippines
    Interesting. I suppose trolero is only used in Spanish, not in Tagalog, because it's not in my Tagalog dictionaries.

    Correct, I've never heard of it spoken in tagalog. The biggest difference of Filipino and Tagalog: Filipino is the Philippine national language, it's a combination of formal tagalog and spanish derived words. Tagalog on the other hand, used by the Tagalogs is just tagalog.

    example:

    Filipino:
    Paupuin mo ang bisita sa silya.

    Tagalog:
    Paupuin mo ang panauhin sa salung-puwit (upuan).

    Translation:
    Let the visitor sit on a chair.
     

    Qcumber

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Paupuin mo ang panauhin sa salung-puwit (upuan). Let the visitor sit on a chair.
    :D :eek: Salung-puwít / salumpuwít doesn't exist in Tagalog. Its case is well-known. It was coined by a anti-Tagalog pro-English Filipino politician to mock his own native language. Shame on him. He then passed it as a neologism created by the Institute of the National Language, and had so much success with it that the Institute was ridiculed into silence, and eventually desestablished by Mrs. Aquino. I found the whole story in a book about Modern Tagalog. The correct Tagálog term is upúan "seat".
     

    Camote

    Member
    Philippines
    :D :eek: Salung-puwít / salumpuwít doesn't exist in Tagalog. Its case is well-known. It was coined by a anti-Tagalog pro-English Filipino politician to mock his own native language. Shame on him. He then passed it as a neologism created by the Institute of the National Language, and had so much success with it that the Institute was ridiculed into silence, and eventually desestablished by Mrs. Aquino. I found the whole story in a book about Modern Tagalog. The correct Tagálog term is upúan "seat".

    :D You got me there, me and my friends make fun of it all the time, adding the salung-suso to replace the english word for a lady's under garment.
     
    Top