Bolting-hutch of beastliness!

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Gianluca Pace

New Member
Italian - Italy
The (dated) expression "bolting-hutch of beastlines" can be found in Henry IV (Part 1, Act 2, Scene 4, Page 19) by William Shakespeare.
I wonder what it means and how to use it. Could anybody tell me?

"Why dost thou converse with that trunk of humors, that bolting-hutch of beastliness, that swollen parcel of dropsies, that huge bombard of sack, that stuffed cloakbag of guts, that roasted Manningtree ox with the pudding in his belly, that reverend Vice, that gray iniquity, that father ruffian, that vanity in years?"
 
  • Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    A bolting-hutch is a hutch (= barrel) used for bolting (= sieving) flour. So Falstaff is a big fat barrel into which all beastly qualities are sieved.

    How to use it? That's up to you, but nobody will understand you, however you use it, unless a high-level Shakespeare scholar.
     

    Gianluca Pace

    New Member
    Italian - Italy
    Sorry for my late answer. Actually I supposed it was a dated expression too. Anyway, thank you a lot! We never stop learning.
     
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