Bon de commande

  • GEmatt

    Senior Member
    English/BE, Français/CH, Deutsch/CH (rustier & rustier)
    google donne 12.5mio résultats pour "order form", contre 3.57mio pour "purchase order". Est-ce peut-être une différence BE/AE?
     

    Smac

    Senior Member
    UK English
    google donne 12.5mio résultats pour "order form", contre 3.57mio pour "purchase order". Est-ce peut-être une différence BE/AE?
    I do not think that is the distinction. An order form might be empty - just providing a standard format in which to place an order. A purchase order is an actual order, which may be placed using an order form or not. I am not sure which term better suits bon de commande, but I am inclined towards order form, since a purchase order is more abstract and might not be on paper at all (an internet purchase, for example).

    However, a web page might contain an electronic form for placing orders... :confused: I guess it is a question of how the expression bon de commande is actually used...
     

    clairet

    Senior Member
    England & English (UK version)
    I do not think that is the distinction. An order form might be empty - just providing a standard format in which to place an order. A purchase order is an actual order, which may be placed using an order form or not. I am not sure which term better suits bon de commande, but I am inclined towards order form, since a purchase order is more abstract and might not be on paper at all (an internet purchase, for example).

    However, a web page might contain an electronic form for placing orders... :confused: I guess it is a question of how the expression bon de commande is actually used...
    I agree with Smac's distinction between "order form" and "purchase order" for an English context. However, in my experience of actually getting "bons de commande" in France, they function as something between these two concepts. They are not empty forms - but nor are they definite commitments to purchase, as a purchase order would be in the UK (believe me, this caused a lot of confusion the first time I encountered a bon de commande). I don't think there is any real equivalent in the UK (don't know about US), where if you order something in a shop, you are committed to paying for it when it arrives. (It still puzzles me, but 2 different shops in France have told me the same thing - I don't have to buy, despite seeming to place an order. In one of the cases, delivery to the shop took too long and I'd found the item elsewhere so I didn't buy - with no problems. Now I just go with the flow.)

    "Bill of order" (AE?) would be "order bill" in the UK, but sounds like a term that would be used between businesses rather than by individuals.
     

    snarkhunter

    Senior Member
    French - France
    A "purchase order" is related to business and is issued by the buyer : individuals would never issue any. But an "order form" may come from anyone, and it is generally issued by the seller, for the customer to fill out and return.

    "purchase order" = "ordre d'achat"
    "order form" = "bon de commande"
     

    clairet

    Senior Member
    England & English (UK version)
    A "purchase order" is related to business and is issued by the buyer : individuals would never issue any. But an "order form" may come from anyone, and it is generally issued by the seller, for the customer to fill out and return.

    "purchase order" = "ordre d'achat"
    "order form" = "bon de commande"
    Well, in practice, in French shops, they fill out the form, including your ID and give you a copy. As I said, the difference from the UK is that in France this doesn't oblige you to buy. Its a kind of request for the shop to order the stuff so that you can buy it from them if you wish. However, I can't think of anything better than "order form", even if the function is slightly different.
     

    Librekom

    Senior Member
    Belgium-French
    A "purchase order" is related to business and is issued by the buyer : individuals would never issue any. But an "order form" may come from anyone, and it is generally issued by the seller, for the customer to fill out and return.

    "purchase order" = "ordre d'achat"
    "order form" = "bon de commande"
    ça me semble être la traduction la plus approriée
     

    Sirious

    New Member
    French-Canada
    Enfaite le bon de commande correspond au document qui prouve que vous comptez achetez quelquechose donc la meilleur traduction est Sales Order pour bon de commande
     

    clairet

    Senior Member
    England & English (UK version)
    After my experiences with bons de commande, recounted above, where I discovered that I wasn't obliged by one to buy what I had ordered, I have now discovered that it works the other way too: the shop isn't obliged to deliver me what I've ordered, even when I've paid up front. I imagine I'm going to get my money back (I'm in the throes of this experience) but the shop has told me (after much prompting) that despite promising delivery 2 months ago they don't actually have any plans to complete the delivery and I'll have to start all over again, having lost 2 months, with another branch. So the only function I can see for the bon de commande is as a receipt for my down payment or full payment, with no implication on either side that the order will be fulfilled. Probably the vagueness of "order form" corresponds best in English to my experiences with bons de commande, though in the UK at least the term implies something a bit more contractual.
     
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