bonne fin de journée/soirée

DearPrudence

Dépêche Mod (AL mod)
IdF
French (lower Normandy)
Hi everybody!
First message so I hope it's not too stupid a question
I would like to know how you could translate "bonne (fin de) journée/soirée" when you say someone goodbye.
Thank you.

PS: this forum is great as well as its members. :thumbsup:


Moderator note: multiple threads merged to create this one
(J'ai laissé le chat, c'est collector...)
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • Agnès E.

    Senior Member
    France, French
    Bonjour DearPrudence,
    Bienvenue sur le forum !

    1. Il n'y a pas de questions stupides, il n'y a que des questions. ;)
    2. I wish you a nice evening pourrait-il faire l'affaire ?
     

    DearPrudence

    Dépêche Mod (AL mod)
    IdF
    French (lower Normandy)
    En fait, je pensais à ce qu'un commerçant peut dire par exemple. Donc peut-être que "I wish you a nice evenig" est un peu long? But thanks all the same.
     

    Amityville

    Senior Member
    English UK
    E-J, on dit 'Good Evening' au moment où on rencontre la personne et 'have a nice evening' quand on part d'habitude.
     

    emma42

    Senior Member
    British English
    I agree with Amityville. Prudence, may I compliment you on your correct usage of the apostrophe in "its" and it's". Many native speakers get this wrong.
     

    DearPrudence

    Dépêche Mod (AL mod)
    IdF
    French (lower Normandy)
    Actually I have the impression that when it's not your native language you're more careful and you think of the grammar when you're write a word while you tend to write as you hear when it's your native language (well, what I said is not very clear ...)
     

    emma42

    Senior Member
    British English
    EJ, I really meant no offence at all. I do maintain that to say "good evening" instead of "goodbye" is posh. Please don't take offence - I am being objective.
     

    E-J

    Senior Member
    England, English
    No offence taken! I hoped the smiley would clarify that :)

    It really depends on the context. I would never say 'Good evening' to friends ... I'd say 'See you!' and the reverse applies to the restaurant scenario I was describing.

    In most situations, including DearPrudence's example (the shopkeeper) I actually think a simple 'Goodbye' would be the most natural thing to say.
     

    anangelaway

    Senior Member
    French
    E-J said:
    No offence taken! I hoped the smiley would clarify that :)

    It really depends on the context. I would never say 'Good evening' to friends ... I'd say 'See you!' and the reverse applies to the restaurant scenario I was describing.

    In most situations, including DearPrudence's example (the shopkeeper) I actually think a simple 'Goodbye' would be the most natural thing to say.
    I totally agree with E-J. On the proper context, I will myself answer when leaving a restaurant: Bye (Goodbye!)! See you soon!
    Edit= & a ''Thank you! (of course)
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    bonne fin de journée = enjoy the rest of your day/afternoon

    bonne soirée = have a good evening/night
    You're absolutely right, but in fact does anybody actually say these things? Apart from well-drilled hotel employees for instance?

    I know that in the past 20 years I've lived in France, I've come across a whole pile of such phrases (bonne fin de week-end, bonne continuation...) which have absolutely no equivalent in everyday spoken (UK) English. I'm certain that I've never in my life spoken the words: enjoy the rest of your afternoon.
     

    wildan1

    Moderando ma non troppo (French-English, CC Mod)
    You're absolutely right, but in fact does anybody actually say these things?
    Yes, Keith, I would say them from time to time--and often hear them, perhaps more in business than in personal relationships.

    Not sure if they are more frequent over here than in European English-speaking areas, however.

    Bonne fin de week-end - Enjoy the rest of your weekend. Yep, I guess I would say that, too.
     

    Icetrance

    Senior Member
    US English
    I'm not a big fan of translating "Bonne fin de journée" by "Enjoy the rest of your day". That's more "Bon reste de journée". Imho, "Bonne fin de journée", which really means "Good late day" (after 4 or 5 going into early evening), could just be translated by "Good afternoon" (around 4) or "Good evening" (after 5).
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    Icetrance, is this another UK/US division? Because I'd never say "Good evening" to a person when leaving them, only when greeting them.

    For me: Good evening means hello, good night means goodbye. Bonne fin de journée also means goodbye (but it's not late enough to go to bed). I suppose I'd translate it as: "Have a nice evening" or "Enjoy your evening".
     

    Icetrance

    Senior Member
    US English
    Icetrance, is this another UK/US division? Because I'd never say "Good evening" to a person when leaving them, only when greeting them.

    For me: Good evening means hello, good night means goodbye. Bonne fin de journée also means goodbye (but it's not late enough to go to bed). I suppose I'd translate it as: "Have a nice evening" or "Enjoy your evening".
    You're right, Keith: We would say "Have a nice evening/Enjoy your evening" as well in North America. I wasn't realizing the full context here.

    Thank you for pointing that out.:)
     

    Elowen R.

    Member
    France - Français
    I am emailing a potential future co-worker. I usually end my emails with "yours sincerely" or "yours faithfully", but the previous few messages were quite informal.

    Is it acceptable to end my email with something like "have a good day"? If it is correct, what do I say if I send my email at, like, 6:00 PM? "Have a nice end of day"? "Have a good evening"?
     

    Enquiring Mind

    Senior Member
    English - the Queen's
    Also: "Enjoy the rest of the day!" if there's something special about that day, e.g., it's your birthday, but usually bonne fin de journée doesn't mean that, it's just a normal sign-off, so LostInLanguage's "best regards" works in most cases, or micia's suggestion in #3.
     

    sarie

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Best regards is fine.

    But I often say "have a good day" too - this is more informal. It doesn't matter at what time you send your email: a good "day" is always appropriate.
     
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