Book a reservation for make a booking/reservation

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Nourished Gourmet

Senior Member
French
Hello there -- Just curious, as long as "to book" means "to make a reservation/booking", is saying "to book a reservation" any grammatically correct in whatever variety of English and, if it indeed is, does it convey any new idea to the fact of making a reservation, or is it just as redundant as saying "repeat again", "continue on", "join together", and "ATM machine". Please click the following links to see some examples: http://www.airtran.com/faq/q/how_do...al_needs.aspx?tt=Disabilities+&+Special+Needs
http://www.ranchobernardoinn.com/reservations/p
Simply note how in the second example - as grammatically correct as these phrases are - "make a reservation" or "make a booking" wouldn't just sound right, unlike "book a reservation" which seems to add some directness to the phrase. Thank you for any help you guys can provide in this.
 
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  • Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Hello Nourished Gourmet

    Yes, "book a reservation" would involve redundancy:).

    You make a reservation, or you make a booking; alternatively, you book something or you reserve something (a table, a room...).

    But you don't, in general, book a reservation.
     

    Nourished Gourmet

    Senior Member
    French
    Hello Loob, Thank you for helping out. Also, can you say "book oneself or someone else into a restaurant, a hotel, or onto a plane or flight," in the same way as you would say "book for oneself or someone else a table in a restaurant, a room in a hotel, or a seat on a plane or flight?"
     
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