book-giver

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Kaiapó

Senior Member
Portuguese
Hi everyone

This comes from Jack London's Martin Eden:

"...such abstractions being objectified in her mind by her father, and Mr. Butler, and by Andrew Carnegie, who, from a poor immigrant boy had arisen to be the book-giver of the world."

Does this "book-giver" mean anything to you? Just a very rich person?

Thanks for your time

K
 
  • Juhasz

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    I've never heard the phrase book-giver and it wouldn't mean anything specific to me - except that I (and many Americans) happen to know that Andrew Carnegie used his incredible wealth to build public libraries around the country.
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Juhasz is right. The phrase is meant literally: by building thousands of libraries, Carnegie had made books available to millions of people.

    You might want to look at the Wikipedia article about Carnegie libraries; here is a small piece to give you an idea of what Carnegie did:
    A Carnegie library is a library built with money donated by Scottish-American businessman and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie. A total of 2,509 Carnegie libraries were built between 1883 and 1929, including some belonging to public and university library systems. 1,689 were built in the United States, 650 in the United Kingdom and Ireland, 125 in Canada, and others in Australia, South Africa, New Zealand, Serbia, the Caribbean, Mauritius, Malaysia, and Fiji.
    Edit: cross-posted
     

    Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    Andrew Carnegie, besides being rich, is well known for his charity work, specifically founding libraries. He therefore gave books to the world.
    (Cross posted)
     

    Kaiapó

    Senior Member
    Portuguese
    Thank you all.

    Building libraries is somehow the same as making books available for all, therefore the man was a book giver.

    K
     
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