book the goods for a vessel

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brandonkim

Senior Member
Korean-Korea
Hi,

I saw the sentence like " ~ so I can book the goods for a vessel leaving for the following week"
Here, I confronted questions, first, I used to think 2) type sentence is correct, but it seems like natives use like 1) type sentence
Then, additional questions popped up in my head, whether 2), 3) could be also correct or not.

Your advice will be highly appreciated.
Thanks.

1) book the goods for a vessel
2) book a vessel
3) book for a vessel
 
  • dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    In American English, in 2017, we would write this sentence as "~ so I can book the goods on a ship leaving next week". That matches (1).

    Nowadays we "send" things by UPS, Fedex and other international carriers. They usually go on airplanes. This sentence was probably written long ago, where they only way to "send" things a long distance was on cargo ships.

    This use of "book" is the same as for passengers: it means "make a reservation". We "book" an airplane or train trip, for example. You can make a reservation for goods on a cargo ship.

    Sentence 2 would mean you reserve the entire cargo ship for a journey (it takes no other passengers), which is very, very expensive. Sentence 3 is incorrect.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    As for #2, I think you "charter" a vessel, rather than "book" it. We "ship" goods by sea, though we can book our own passage on a ship.

    ~ so I can book the goods for a vessel leaving for the following week
    Where did you see the sentence, brandonkim?
     

    brandonkim

    Senior Member
    Korean-Korea
    <-----Threads merged at this point by moderator (Florentia52)----->

    I have seen a sentence " please push your factory to complete #PO1234 by this Friday, so I can book the goods for a vessel leaving for the following week"
    Here, I started wondering about sentence structure which uses " book"

    before, I used to think 2)type structures is right, but when I saw native's sentences as above , on the contrary, it seems like 1), 3) are right.

    So, I would like to know which one is correct and which one is incorrect when you use the words" book"
    Your advice will be highly appreciated.
    Thanks.

    1) book the goods for a vessel
    2) book a vessel
    3) book for a vessel
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    Are you asking whether the phrases you've marked as 2) and 3) can be substituted for "book the goods for a vessel" in the original sentence?

    Also, please tell us where you found the original sentence.
     

    brandonkim

    Senior Member
    Korean-Korea
    Are you asking whether the phrases you've marked as 2) and 3) can be substituted for "book the goods for a vessel" in the original sentence?

    Also, please tell us where you found the original sentence.
    This is the sentence I 've received from our Amercia counterpart.
    I assumed that the person who wrote above sentence is American.
    So, what I want to know is when I use the word " book" whether I can use like 2) and 3) as well as 1)
    .
    Shortly, Yes, I want to know 2),3) can be substituted for " book the goods for a vessel" in the original sentence under the assumption that 1) is perfect sentence
     

    brandonkim

    Senior Member
    Korean-Korea
    In American English, in 2017, we would write this sentence as "~ so I can book the goods on a ship leaving next week". That matches (1).

    Nowadays we "send" things by UPS, Fedex and other international carriers. They usually go on airplanes. This sentence was probably written long ago, where they only way to "send" things a long distance was on cargo ships.

    This use of "book" is the same as for passengers: it means "make a reservation". We "book" an airplane or train trip, for example. You can make a reservation for goods on a cargo ship.

    Sentence 2 would mean you reserve the entire cargo ship for a journey (it takes no other passengers), which is very, very expensive. Sentence 3 is incorrect.
    Thanks a million. It was quite helpful.:)
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I don't know whether your correspondent's phrasing is very natural. I would have written:

    "...so I can arrange for the goods to be shipped (on a vessel that will leave) next week."
     
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