boom vs. soar

Penélope Liu

Member
Chinese
There is a single choice question:

The cost of living _ in the 20th century, and economists expect it to continue rising in the decades ahead.

The correct answer is soared. But one of those four choices is boomed, which I have no idea why is not suitable here.
Thanks in advance for your help.
 
  • Rigardo Lee

    Senior Member
    I would say you're pretty correct in saying both are carrying the connotation of a sudden burst of something that's about to happen.

    But, I wouldn't imagine myself using 'boom' to express that idea of general cost or prices.
     

    Chasint

    Senior Member
    English - England
    We don't usually say that a cost booms. The verb 'boom' is usually taken to refer to a growth in the economy. If on the other hand, the cost of living is rising then people are having to save their money and work harder so no-one is experiencing a boom (except perhaps the loan-sharks).

    Note

    Be sure to distinguish between standard of living and cost of living.
     
    Last edited:

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    I would say you're pretty correct in saying both are carrying the connotation of a sudden burst of something
    I cannot agree with this.

    To boom is to show a sudden, remarkable (think of an explosion) and beneficial increase.
    To soar implies that the subject made a swift and effortless rise to a great height. (Think of an eagle or a glider rising swiftly in the air.) However, to soar is neutral.
     
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