booster is the most efficient air booster to use - meaning?

Baltic Sea

Banned
Polish
Hello all users!

The Haskel booster is a pneumatic booster, having a single stage double acting pump and is the most efficient air booster to use when taking air from the cascade to drive the Haskel booster.
This term is from Air / Oxygen Boosters.Under "Haskel" in paragraph 1, in line 3 is this text:The Haskel booster is a pneumatic booster, having a single stage double acting pump and is the most efficient air booster to use when taking air from the cascade to drive the Haskel booster.

In my opinion, booster,........ is the most efficient air booster to use means booster,........ is the most efficient air booster which/that is used. (the booster is used).

Thank you.
 
  • Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Baltic Sea. I don't think your question is clear. That structure ... the most efficient booster to use when taking ... is a standard construction in English. The full sentence doesn't appear to make much sense, but that is a matter of logic (and possibly punctuation), not grammar.

    Similar sentences using the same structure are:
    A screwdriver is the most efficient tool to use when driving a screw.
    A hammer is the most efficient tool to use when driving a nail.
    A bicycle may be the most efficient form of transport to use when the roads are busy.

    Does that help?
     

    Baltic Sea

    Banned
    Polish
    So I presume that my understanding booster,........ is the most efficient air booster which/that is used is correct. Am I right?
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    The sentence specifies three qualities of the the Haskel booster:

    1) It is a pneumatic booster
    2) It has a single stage double acting pump
    3) It is the most efficient air booster to use when... etc.


    Your question doesn't quite make sense. What are you asking? Repeating the question doesn't help. ;) Try using different words and asking the question in a different way.

    To be fair, the writing itself doesn't seem to be very clear. They may be trying to say that the single stage double acting pump provides the most efficient air flow when connecting the Haskel booster to the cascade (whatever that is). The last part of the sentence sounds like you're hooking up the Haskel booster to the Haskel booster. :confused:
     
    Last edited:

    Baltic Sea

    Banned
    Polish
    I know that in English it is common to use "superlative/first/second/only/latest/last ... etc. + to infinitive" structure. I also know that this structure is an equivalent of "superlative/first/second/only/latest/last ... etc. who/that/which + present/past tense" structure.
    For instance:
    A bicycle may be the most efficient form of transport to use when the roads are busy. = A bicycle may be the most efficient form of transport which/that is used when the roads are busy.
    I think that 'my' sentence follows the pattern of "superlative/first/second/only/latest/last ... etc. + to infinitive" structure.
    Hence, booster,........ is the most efficient air booster to use = booster,........ is the most efficient air booster which/that is used.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Ah! No. "To use" does not guarantee that it is used. A new product that is the most efficient product made might be the most efficient to use but if no one has bought it and used it yet, it is not yet the most efficient product that is used. A less efficient, older product is actually the most efficient product that is currently used.

    Does that make sense?

    For example, "Studies have shown that shipping by train is the most efficient method to use in terms of fuel economy, but millions of products are shipped by less efficient diesel trucks, the most popular method of transport that is used today in the U.S."
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    The nuance here is along these lines:

    X is the best to use for Y. That is a recommendation for the future.
    X is the best that is used for Y. That is an opinion about the current state of affairs.
     

    Baltic Sea

    Banned
    Polish
    The nuance is here as JulianStuart. So, my sentence booster,........ is the most efficient air booster to use = booster,........ is the most efficient air booster which/that may / can / will be used. :confused:
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    In my opinion:

    "... is the most efficient booster that can be used..."

    is the closest in meaning.

    It doesn't mean it is used, but it is the most efficient one that can be used.

    They are not exactly identical in meaning to me, though, and I'm trying to figure out what the difference is to me.

    I guess "to use", as JulianStuart said, is a recommendation, while "can be used" is stating a fact without an actual recommendation implied.
     

    Baltic Sea

    Banned
    Polish
    Thank you JamesM.

    I would like to present you with a conclusion I have arrived at:
    1. "superlative/first/second/only/latest/last ... etc. + to infinitive" structure - a current state: examples:
    She was one of the first to arrive. = She was one of the first who/that arrived. He is the first (= very willing) to admit that much of his success is due to his good looks. = He is the first who/that is
    inclined to admit that much of his success is due to his good looks.
    I am always the last (person) to know. = I am always the last (person) who/that gets to know.
    2. "superlative/first/second/only/latest/last ... etc. + to infinitive" structure - a recommendation: examples:
    A screwdriver is the most efficient tool to use when driving a screw. = A screwdriver is the most efficient tool which/that
    can be used when driving a screw.
    A hammer is the most efficient tool to use when driving a nail. = A hammer is the most efficient tool which/that can be
    used when driving a nail.
    A bicycle may be the most efficient form of transport to use when the roads are busy. =
    A bicycle may be the most efficient form of transport which/that can be used when the roads are busy.

    Please put me right on the above conclusions if I am wrong. Thank you.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    I think you're mixing two senses of the infinitive here.

    A better parallel would be:

    She would be the best person to manage the Dallas office. (Evaluation / Recommendation)
    He is the most likely choice to lead the company to new heights. (Evaluation / Recommendation)
    A clawfoot hammer is the most efficient tool to use in this situation. (Evaluation / Recommendation)
    A bicycle is the most efficient form of transport to use when roads are busy. (Evaluation / Recommendation)


    "She was the first person to arrive" is simply a statement of fact. It is indeed the equivalent of "She was the first person who arrived at the party."

    [edit] Ah! Sorry. That was what you were saying. I see now. You were giving examples of two different possible interpretations of the structure. Yes, I agree with your conclusions. These are not the only possible meanings of this structure but they are definitely two distinct possible meanings.
     

    Baltic Sea

    Banned
    Polish
    Thank you all very much for helping me to distinguish between "superlative/first/second/only/latest/last ... etc. + to infinitive" structure as a current state and "superlative/first/second/only/latest/last ... etc. + to infinitive" structure as a recommendation. You did help me a lot.
     
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