boring informational texts

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AntiScam

Senior Member
Arabic
Hello,

Are there informal words or expressions that you use to describe a text you study that is mainly information you read and take in (so often but not always boring) but void from mental stimulation and cognitive challenge. Texts of this sort are historical facts and definitions that you need to memorize. Mental stimulation text is a text that includes presenting activities, involving logical or mathematical problems or doing programming.

An example in context:
Chapter one is just a history of computer science, and chapter two is all about theory, the basic building blocks of blah blah blah; you see it is all [just] _______________. Now chapters three and four are quite different, you learn how to convert between number systems, and how to design and code your own Android apps, so it is all activities and [no boring] ______________________.
 
  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    "Dry", as an adjective. I cannot think of a noun that might be used. "It is all very dry" appears to describe your first chapter.
     

    AntiScam

    Senior Member
    Arabic
    "Dry", as an adjective. I cannot think of a noun that might be used. "It is all very dry" appears to describe your first chapter.
    Dry sounds like a very good suggestion, Uncle Jack. Thanks.

    While searching I run into this definition from Cambridge. The issue with bumf is that it is restricted by the examples in the definitions. It does not look like it is used to describe school/college topics in textbooks. Otherwise it would have been a good alternative.

    bumf, bumph UK [bʌm p f] noun uncountable mainly UK informal
    printed information, such as an advertisement or official document, that is usually unwanted and not interesting
    • I got a load of bumf from my bank in the post today.
    Trivia would have been a good word if the material was not important. The material is not unimportant-it's just dry.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    "Bumf" is stuff that can be ignored. It usually refers to advertising material, but can be used for things like the lengthy disclaimers you sometimes encounter at the bottom of business emails, things that very few people actually bother reading. I would not use it for the contents of a book, however boring they may be.

    "Trivia" has the wrong connotation. Trivia is often very interesting, and whole newspapers are devoted to it in Britain. :)
     

    manfy

    Senior Member
    German - Austria
    If you look at dry subject matter as something that puts you to sleep, then engaging might be a good antonym for the hands-on knowledge taught in chapter three and four.
     
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