borne along like a basket of eggs

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yuna

Senior Member
Korea/Korean
Hello.

This is the paragraphs from The Beautiful and Damned.

Two young Jewish men passed him, talking in loud voices and craning their necks here and there in fatuous supercilious glances. They were dressed in suits of the exaggerated tightness then semi-fashionable; their turned over collars were notched at the Adam's apple; they wore gray spats and carried gray gloves on their cane handles.
Passed a bewildered old lady borne along like a basket of eggs between two men who exclaimed to her of the wonders of Times Square--explained them so quickly that the old lady, trying to be impartially interested, waved her head here and there like a piece of wind-worried old orange-peel.

"Passed a bewildered old lady (borne along like a basket of eggs) between two men..."
: the parenthesis is difficult. Does "borne along" here mean 'carrying?' so that the parenthesis means 'carrying something like a basket of eggs?' It's just my guess. Any help?
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    This should be Fitzgerald's way of saying that the men were escorting a frail old woman with unusual care, as though she were a basket of eggs that could fall to the ground and break.
     

    yuna

    Senior Member
    Korea/Korean
    This should be Fitzgerald's way of saying that the men were escorting a frail old woman with unusual care, as though she were a basket of eggs that could fall to the ground and break.
    Hmm... And that doesn't necessarily mean that she is willingly helped out by the two men?
     
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