both sides of the coin

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Weronika2011

New Member
Polish
Hi,
Can I use "both sides of the coin" instead of "advantages and disadvantages"?

For example:

Living in the country? I will try to present both advantages and disadvantages.

Or

Living in the country? I will try to present both sides of the coin.


Do these two sentences mean the same? If not, what's the difference? Can the second version be correct in any context.

Thank you for your help.
 
  • bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    Is this a title, a first sentence in a text, or in the middle of one? Is this the full sentence?

    Phrases involving "two sides" or "two faces" could be used in this context, but the specific idea of advantages and disadvantages, pros and cons, or the good and the bad, would not necessarily be immediately understood by the reader.

    "Living in the country? I will try to present both sides of the coin" may be problematic because the first part, "living in the country," can be read in any number of ways. You could say "Country life?," for example, in some way better preparing the reader for the subject.
     

    Weronika2011

    New Member
    Polish
    It was supposed to be the answer to the question "would you like to live in the country?" and in my answer I wanted to present both negative and positive sides of such a living place.
     
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