Bouclage

Hello

Senior Member
English
Hi guys:
How would you say Bouclage in english. I know what it means but just cant think of the word. Its in journalism, the final date that things can be submitted before things go to press.
this is the definition i found in french :
fait de terminer la mise au point rédactionelle et la mise en pages définitive de l'edition d'un journal.

Any ideas would be greatly appreciated.
Ashamed to call myself an english speaker.. lol, but when u just cant think of a word... :eek:
Thanks
 
  • Hello

    Senior Member
    English
    Yeah being put to bed is a term, but a bit informal..
    Oh well, ill give it a go and see what happens!
    Thanks y'all
     
    charlie2 said:
    "To finish it off before the deadline", perhaps?
    Ya, I'd say "deadline", or "wrapping the project up (by deadline)", because there is the idea in "bouclage" of bringing things together, boucler like "to buckle"... Which in my wee little head creates an image similar to that of "wrapping". I even wonder if it would be understandable to say "We have to buckle up the project". I think it would be understood....
     

    vittel

    Senior Member
    french, France
    Hello all :),
    I'm having difficulties to translate this sentence:
    "Quelques heures avant le bouclage, la rédaction du journal décida de bouleverser entièrement le sommaire du numéro pour réaliser on dossier spécial sur l'événement".

    Trying to make "to put the paper to bed" passive... er, tricky :eek::
    "A few hours before the paper should've been put to bed, the newspaper staff decided to completely change the issue summary, to instead make a special report on the event".

    I'm not sure if deadline could work here, as the term isn't specific to journalism (?). Same for "wrapping sth up", isn't there a more journalistic term?
    And the passive of the expression makes the sentence very weird to me. Or maybe is it correct after all? :confused:

    J'ai du mal à manier cette expression :(.
     
    Actually, what comes to mind for the written press is "going to print", which I think you can use figuratively, ie, even if the upcoming issue was not literally heading off to the printer. Something like: A few hours before going to print, the editorial staff decided to completely rehaul the summary in order to do/publish a special report on the event".

    Just as a note, we wouldn't use "make" a special story, it would be do/write/edit/publish. A common confusion for Frenchies with make, do, faire. :)

    P.S. It is great that you used the "search feature" to turn up this old thread instead of creating a new one!
     

    vittel

    Senior Member
    french, France
    Thank you for your answer bad grammar! :)

    I'll go for your proposal, it sounds great.

    Though I'm a bit disappointed to see that there isn't a generic term that includes all media in all contexts:
    - On a est en retard, on a dépassé l'heure du bouclage!
    - Ils ont bouclé le reportage en direct, elle a fait la voix-off pendant la diffusion du reportage.
    - L'édition du week-end est bouclée, reste à faire le bouclage de celle de demain.
    - Elle a bouclé sa chronique radio tout à l'heure.

    The french version is shorter and easier, for once :D.

    As for "make", thank you, I always need to think twice to choose the good one, which I forgot to do this time. :eek:

    Merci encore.
     

    broglet

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Hello all :),
    I'm having difficulties to translate this sentence:
    "Quelques heures avant le bouclage, la rédaction du journal décida de bouleverser entièrement le sommaire du numéro pour réaliser on dossier spécial sur l'événement".
    I would say (BE) "a few hours before the publication deadline, the editors decided to do a complete rethink of the contents to include a special feature on the event"
     

    phineasiquit

    Member
    U.S. English
    Another expression in English is to be "in the can." I.e., "That piece has to be in the can by 1 AM", meaning 1 AM is the deadline for inclusion. This may only be a broadcasting term; I don't know if it's print journalism. I work in broadcasting.
     
    Last edited:

    wildan1

    Moderando ma non troppo (French-English, CC Mod)
    Another expression in English is to be "in the can." I.e., "That piece has to be in the can by 1 AM", meaning 1 AM is the deadline for inclusion. This may only be a broadcasting term; I don't know if it's print journalism. I work in broadcasting.
    In the can is the colloquial expression used for films or recordings, coming from the days when everything was recorded by film or magnetic tape, wound onto a spool and put into a round metal holder -- a can

    Going to press is the standard term for books or periodicals. The press deadline.

    Putting the book/paper to bed is indeed a frequent colloquial expression for this--on the same register as le bouclage.
     
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