bounce ideas off somebody...

  • JamesM

    Senior Member
    Cuchuflete said it perfectly, in my opinion.

    I'd say the difference between "run an idea by you" and "bounce an idea off of you" is that the first phrase can often imply a request for approval. A supervisor might "run an idea by his boss" about a new process or procedure, looking for possible approval of the idea. The supervisor might "bounce the idea off a co-worker" first, though, to see if the idea merits "running it by the boss." :)
     

    mink-shin

    Senior Member
    Korean - Korea, Republic of
    Hi, JamesM.

    I'm here because I didn't understand a sentence following, "So thanks for coming by, we just wanted to bounce a few ideas off of you about the wedding ceremony".

    Having read your post, I'm totally understand it.

    But I've just had another question all of sudden.

    "bounce an idea off of you"
    Is it necessary to write 'of' after 'off?
    I'm just curious if it's essential to understand the meaning, because sometimes I've seen 'off of' has same meaning with 'off' before.

    Is it okay to omit 'of' as were some sentences I've seen before?

    My guessing is, because "bounce off" is a verbal phrase, that I should not omit 'of' or there's no preposition for 'you'.

    So I don't think I can omit it, I think not only can I but also I should not. But I'm not sure about it.

    It would be my pleasure if you answer me. Thank you.
     

    Linkway

    Senior Member
    British English
    In general, "...bounce an idea off you..." is correct and adding "of" is just a matter of preference or style and does not change the meaning.

    I think whether people say "off of" varies a lot by region and by education level.

    In ordinary speech, either would be unremarkable.



    Personally, I tend to use it in very few circumstances, eg:

    I need to get this coffee stain off of my white trousers.

    (I don't know why!!!)
     

    mink-shin

    Senior Member
    Korean - Korea, Republic of
    In general, "...bounce an idea off you..." is correct and adding "of" is just a matter of preference or style and does not change the meaning.

    I think whether people say "off of" varies a lot by region and by education level.

    In ordinary speech, either would be unremarkable.

    Personally, I tend to use it in very few circumstances, eg:

    I need to get this coffee stain off of my white trousers.

    (I don't know why!!!)
    Hi, Linkway,

    After reading your post, I tried to search 'off of' instead of 'bounce off', which subject is what I've already searched in this forum, and I came across this ; >> Topic summary: Preposition - using <off of> rather than <off>.

    Having read that thread, to me, it seems more bigger subject whether we use 'off of' or just 'off' than I expected.

    Anyway, thank you for your kind Contribution, Linkway.
     
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