bouncing(?) of glass during breaking

< Previous | Next >

ouzhantekin

Senior Member
Turkish - Standard
Hey there,

I was proofreading for an engineer friend of mine and I realized he wrote:

"The operator must pay extra attention splash of glass in case the glass breaks."

I thought this sounded strange because I have always seen "splash" with liquids, not with solid objects; however I couldn't provide any suggestion whatsoever.

The only thing that came to my mind was "richochet" as in "the bullet richocheted". Would that make any sense?

Thanks in advance.
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    I'd probably use something like "pay extra attention to the flying glass". If the glass breaks into shards or splinters, it would make sense to use "attention to the shards/splinters of glass".

    "Splash of glass" was odd, but I understood what he meant. "Ricochet" is odd, but I understand what you mean.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    What is this sentence supposed to mean? The operator (what is the operator doing?) must pay extra attention to what exactly?
     

    ouzhantekin

    Senior Member
    Turkish - Standard
    Let me put it this way: The operator is working in the glass-cutting station in the factory. So he must pay great attention to breaking of glass during the operation. Is that clearer now?
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    You are right, in the literal sense, only liquids 'splash'. Ricochet does not work, as this means "to bounce off, or be deflected by, something."

    However, having said that, the whole sentence does not make sense. I suspect it intends to warn the operator of the danger from flying shards[1] if the glass that he is handling breaks. Is this so?

    [1]The definition is in the WRF dictionary.

    (Crossposted with the explanation.)
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    When you say "pay attention to the breaking of glass", do you mean that he tries to avoid breaking any glass?

    Or do you mean that he is exposed to a lot of breaking glass so he must know how to avoid it or protect himself from being injured?

    Cross-posted with Paul
     

    ouzhantekin

    Senior Member
    Turkish - Standard
    I'd probably use something like "pay extra attention to the flying glass". If the glass breaks into shards or splinters, it would make sense to use "attention to the shards/splinters of glass".

    "Splash of glass" was odd, but I understood what he meant. "Ricochet" is odd, but I understand what you mean.
    "Flying glass" quite conveys the idea, I guess, although it brought shards of glass flying in a carefree manner into my mind :) But it is just me and my imagination.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Having worked for a window and glass door manufacturer and having cut a lot of glass myself, this seems a little odd. There isn't a lot of flying glass in the glass-cutting process. I'm sorry to ask even more questions, but is the concern about glass splinters or great flyng shards?
     

    ouzhantekin

    Senior Member
    Turkish - Standard
    You are right, in the literal sense, only liquids 'splash'. Ricochet does not work, as this means "to bounce off, or be deflected by, something."

    However, having said that, the whole sentence does not make sense. I suspect it intends to warn the operator of the danger from flying shards[1] if the glass that he is handling breaks. Is this so?
    That is exactly what is meant by the sentence. So I guess I am going for "Pay great attention against flying shards during glass cutting operation." Any objection to this?
     

    ouzhantekin

    Senior Member
    Turkish - Standard
    Having worked for a window and glass door manufacturer and having cut a lot of glass myself, this seems a little odd. There isn't a lot of flying glass in the glass-cutting process. I'm sorry to ask even more questions, but is the concern about glass splinters or great flyng shards?
    I cannot say much about the procedure since I have never been to the production area myself. However, as my friend explained the warning is against the "flying shards" that might prick your eyes or skin etc.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Perhaps: "Be careful of flying shards of glass during the cutting operation."

    But the sign makes it seem like a common occurrence and anyone creating flying shards when cutting glass doesn't know what they're doing. :rolleyes:

    If you press the glass cutter too hard, you'll create splintering on the surface, but the splinters don't normally fly around. And you'll only do that once or twice before you figure out how to cut glass.

    Added: Reading your last post, I would suspect that these are splinters rather than shards. These can be dangerous because they're so small -- you can pick them up on your fingers and transfer them to your face or eyes. Maybe: "Be careful of glass splinters during the cutting operation."
     

    ouzhantekin

    Senior Member
    Turkish - Standard
    Perhaps: "Be careful of flying shards of glass during the cutting operation."

    But the sign makes it seem like a common occurrence and anyone creating flying shards when cutting glass doesn't know what they're doing. :rolleyes:

    If you press the glass cutter too hard, you'll create splintering on the surface, but the splinters don't normally fly around. And you'll only do that once or twice before you figure out how to cut glass.

    Added: Reading your last post, I would suspect that these are splinters rather than shards. These can be dangerous because they're so small -- you can pick them up on your fingers and transfer them to your face or eyes. Maybe: "Be careful of glass splinters during the cutting operation."
    So I believe shards are bigger than splinters :eek: ... Thank you very much for the reply.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Yes, much larger. :)

    I would think the cutters already have eye protection and perhaps gloves, not to mention some sort of jacket or coat. So the major concern would be that someone would rub their face with a rubber-gloved hand that had picked up small glass splinters. At least that's my experience.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    That is exactly what is meant by the sentence. So I guess I am going for "Pay great attention against flying shards during glass cutting operation." Any objection to this?
    Yes,
    (i) If this is going to be read in the EU, the warning itself is of no use: it must include, or be accompanied by, directions that instruct/demand the operator wear protective equipment. Being told that flying particles of glass are likely to blind you is of no use unless the risk of injury can be reduced to all but zero.
    (ii) You pay attention to something -> any other preposition is wrong.
    (iii) Paying attention to flying shards of glass is of no use. It is like paying attention to a tiger that is running towards you - it will not prevent your being eaten.
    (iv) You need to state something like: "Wear eye protection and gloves at all times. Glass breaks and splinters, shards and particles can cause serious injury." The operator will, by his familiarity with glass, realises how the damage might be caused.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top