bound to move house. [acceptable?]

Franciszek Kolpanowicz

Senior Member
Polish
There are 3 options of a sentence: "When are they hoping to/going to/bound to move the house?". Hoping to and going to seems fine to me - I hope it is? so the one left is "bound to". Why isn't it proper here and in what circumstances is it used?
 
  • Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    "to move house" == to go to live in a different house

    "to move a/the house" == to physically move the building from one location to another (very unusual except with mobile homes!)

    "to be bound to" == 'to be obliged to' or 'to be strongly expected to'
     

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I agree, but in the question form 'When are they bound to move house?', it isn't feasible.
    I agree. In the past, that sentence would have been possible but nowadays we would have to say either:

    'When are they expected to move house?'
    or
    'When are they obliged to move house?'

    The above two have different meanings but they represent the archaic meanings of 'to be bound'.
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    I agree, but in the question form 'When are they bound to move house?', it isn't feasible.
    Yes and no. I can think of contrived circumstances in which this question could work, but frankly it's the job of the OP, in this case Franciszek Kolpanowicz, to provide us with the context in which this may or may not work. It's also his job to tell us what it is he's seeking to communicate and why.
     
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