bowl up

Discussion in 'English Only' started by zooropa1844, Feb 8, 2008.

  1. zooropa1844 New Member

    Spain Spanish
    I'm not sure about the meaning of this verb in the context of this sentence:

    " it allows you to check your tools before bowling up at the bottom of Orion Face in March "

    I found it in a mountaineering web-site

    Thanks for your help!
     
  2. Lexiphile Senior Member

    Germany
    England English
    Hello Zooro and welcome to the forum,
    This verb stems from the analogy of a bowling ball. It arrives (at the end of the alley) with a certain force. One might speak of someone "bowling into the office" if he arrives on the run, slams to door wide open and generally attracts the attention of everyone present.

    Just why the analogy fits to an arrival at the foot of a mountain is not clear. Perhaps the idea is that one arrives, fully loaded with climbing gear, full of enthusiasm. Then to find that you've left your tool behind might be an embarrassment.
     
  3. zooropa1844 New Member

    Spain Spanish
    Thanks, Lexiphile, for your post.

    But I don't understand yet the role of the particle "up" in that collocation.

    Does it mean direction or doesn't?

    Thanks!
     
  4. Lexiphile Senior Member

    Germany
    England English
    No, it certainly doesn't mean literally "up." One can bowl into an office. One can bowl out the door. One can bowl down a hill. One can bowl across the field. And one can bowl up to a mountain (or anything else) when one arrives there and stops.
     
  5. zooropa1844 New Member

    Spain Spanish
    Thanks, Lexiphile, for sharing your knowledge of English language.

    In most of your examples the preposition after "bowl" means direction or that seems to me (INTO an office, OUT the door, DOWN a hill, ACROSS the field), except "UP TO the mountain".

    But in the original sentence we had "bowl up at the bottom of the mountain" instead of bowl up to the bottom of ...", so maybe it had a directional meaning. Don't you think so?

    Thanks in advance!
     
  6. bibliolept

    bibliolept Senior Member

    Northern California
    AE, Español
    Another possibility, though perhaps not as likely: I wonder if "bowling up at the bottom" doesn't refer to an equipment failure that causes you to fall to the bottom of the mountain.
     
  7. zooropa1844 New Member

    Spain Spanish
    Bibliolept, as a non-native English speaker that was my first thought, because the article was about the need of sharpening your ice axe and your crampons to avoid accidents in winter conditions.

    Reading the sentence I translated it as "you should take care of your equipment before falling down". But somebody told me that maybe it meant "you should check your equipment before climbing up or something similar".

    Now, I understand perfectly the meaning of the verb "bowl" with the explanation of Lexiphile, but I have a doubt about the role of "up".
     
  8. GreenWhiteBlue

    GreenWhiteBlue Senior Member

    The City of New York
    USA - English
    The "up" is commonly used to refer to motion that comes to a stop.

    The car pulled up to the corner.
    The children all ran up to the ice cream truck.
    John heard Mary scream, and rushed up to her to find out what happened.
     
  9. emma42 Senior Member

    North East USA
    British English
    I was just about to say the same thing. So, the "up" has nothing to do with a literal upward motion. A couple more examples:

    The children skipped excitedly up to grandma, who was carrying sweets and toys for them.

    She sidled up to him, and whispered something into his ear.
     
  10. bibliolept

    bibliolept Senior Member

    Northern California
    AE, Español
    And, of course, you could simply "end up" at the bottom of the mountain and even "end up" in traction.
     
  11. zooropa1844 New Member

    Spain Spanish
    Thank you very much, GreenWhiteBlue and Emma, for all your examples of "UP" meaning a movement which comes to an end. All of them are followed by TO. Can we find "UP" (meaning exactly that), without any or a different preposition?

    Bibliolept, if the original sentence had been "before ending up at the bottom of the mountain", the meaning would have been straightforward. But with "bowl" I'm not sure if the mountaineers are arriving to the bottom of the mountain from the valley or from the top (after falling).
     
  12. panjandrum

    panjandrum Occasional Moderator

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    "Bowl up" is a phrasal verb, meaning to arrive. Up has no particular directional significance.
     
  13. GreenWhiteBlue

    GreenWhiteBlue Senior Member

    The City of New York
    USA - English
    If you mean can we find a phrasal verb using "up", yes, we can.

    He pulled up at the traffic light.
    I wish you wouldn't rush up like that all the time.
    It is not as if you can just walk up and ask the boss for a raise; you need to make sure he is in a good mood first.
     
  14. Loob

    Loob Senior Member

    English UK
    Well, the Collins Cobuild Phrasal Verbs Dictionary suggests that "up" is used in phrasal verbs in the following ways:
    (1) literal sense: movement from a lower position to a higher one
    (2) to indicate an increase in quantity or intensity eg "speed up"
    (3) with some verbs, to indicate that something is starting or beginning eg "open up"
    (4) to indicate restriction eg "belt up" "button up"
    (5) to indicate that people are moving closer together eg "creep up on"
    (6) to indicate that something has been spoilit or damaged in some way eg "mess up"
    (7) to indicate that something has been completed or finished eg "drink up".

    I suspect that the 'up' in "bowl up" is closest to meaning (5).

    In any event, "bowl up" = "casually turn up" = "casually arrive".
     
  15. zooropa1844 New Member

    Spain Spanish
    Loob, it was really helpful your post.

    I looked up the phrasal verb in some general dictionaries and I couldn't find it. Maybe I should consider to buy a phrasal verbs dictionary. With that meaning of "casually turn up or arrive" the original sentence makes sense.

    Thank you
     
  16. panjandrum

    panjandrum Occasional Moderator

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
  17. zooropa1844 New Member

    Spain Spanish
    panjandrum, I have the idea that English made dictionaries are really good. Aren't the phrasal verbs ones so good or complete as the general and billingual ones?
     

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