Bowling mark

mehrk

Senior Member
Turkish
Hello Everybody

In Jasper Jones novel there`s some Cricket`s terms which are unknown and ambiguous to me. I wonder if anyone could help me understanding them. Here is an example:

"Jeffrey stamps and scrapes his bowling mark, but he is shoved, hard, out of his chosen net. I hear someone say, “Fuck off, gook,” and my gut knots."

Here I am not sure what a Bowling Mark could possibly be, and what "stamp" and "scrape" mean here.

There`s a couple of other Cricket-related terms that I`d post in the next threads. I appreciate your help.
 
  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    A bowling mark is a mark on the ground that is the start of a bowler's run to the wicket (where he will bowl the ball at the batsman.) Each bowler will make his own mark.

    When he arrives at the wicket, the bowler must bowl from a very precise position and therefore his run to that spot must be a precise distance.

    To stamp has its normal meaning to force the leg and foot to the ground.
    To scrape - in this case, the scraping is done with the shoe by scratching the surface of the earth. (Cricket boots have spikes on the sole, so this helps the scraping.)
     

    mehrk

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    A bowling mark is a mark on the ground that is the start of a bowler's run to the wicket (where he will bowl the ball at the batsman.) Each bowler will make his own mark.

    When he arrives at the wicket, the bowler must bowl from a very precise position and therefore his run to that spot must be a precise distance.

    To stamp has its normal meaning to force the leg and foot to the ground.
    To scrape - in this case, the scraping is done with the shoe by scratching the surface of the earth. (Cricket boots have spikes on the sole, so this helps the scraping.)
    Thank you so much for your help. I just hope you could help me with other terms which I`ll send later (in next threads.)
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    He stamps his foot/heel on the ground and scrapes his foot/heel across the grass to make a visible mark on the pitch.
    If I may be just a little pedantic, the ground where the bowler runs up isn't part of the pitch. The pitch starts from the place where the bowler releases the ball and extends till the batsman's stumps. This is unlike football of course where the entire field of play is the pitch.:)
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    If I may be just a little pedantic, the ground where the bowler runs up isn't part of the pitch. The pitch starts from the place where the bowler releases the ball and extends till the batsman's stumps. This is unlike football of course where the entire field of play is the pitch.:)
    Well I never - we (during my 12 years of cricket at school) always referred to the 1 chain (22 yd) strip as "the wicket" (the part that is troublesome of it gets "sticky") and the word pitch referred to the spot/length of where the ball landed in front of the batsman. We didnt use the term "pitch" to refer to that strip, although the glossaries confirm your point - must of been a crummy school :eek: :D
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    We didnt use the term "pitch" to refer to that strip, although the glossaries confirm your point - must of been a crummy school :eek: :D
    "Wicket" is used for that strip of ground too, so your school was right. And "pitch" also refers to the ball landing on the pitch in front of the batsman.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    "Wicket" is used for that strip of ground too, so your school was right. And "pitch" also refers to the ball landing on the pitch in front of the batsman.
    I knew we were right in what we called wicket and pitch but was unaware until this thread that others also used pitch in the way you said:)
     
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