Box bed

RCLB

Senior Member
Portuguese - Brazil
Hello everyone. What is the name of the bed in the photo? I know it is not an ottoman-storage bed because you can't store anything in them as they don't have a "trunk". Observation: What we see in the photo is not the mattress, it is only the structure, without the mattress. I need to know what this structure is called in English-speaking countries.
 

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  • kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Yes, that's the standard U.S. terminology for a traditional bed - you have the (often metal) frame, the box spring and the mattress. Of course, newer high tech beds are sometimes completely different.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    It's a divan to me. Most divans do not have springs, indeed, the space is often taken up by storage drawers. The springs are in the mattress.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I'vd not looked at the development/discussion behind the wiki article to know hpw reliable it is:) In the OP, unless we have an inside view we can;t tell whether it has springs or not - they are not visible in the picture but see the image in the article.
    A box-spring (or divan in some countries) is a type of bed base typically consisting of a sturdy wooden frame covered in cloth and containing springs. Usually the box-spring is placed on top of a wooden or metal bedframethat sits on the floor and acts as a brace, except in the UK where the divan is more often fitted with small casters.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    The question concerns the name for the springless base for a bed in the picture in the first post.
    It appears that the speakers of British English and speakers of American English will have different answers.

    @RCLB It will help if you will tell us which variety of English you are interested in, or whether you are interested in both.

    (What to call the rolling mechanisms at the bottom of the legs is a separate question and off-topic in this thread.
     

    RCLB

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    The question concerns the name for the springless base for a bed in the picture in the first post.
    It appears that the speakers of British English and speakers of American English will have different answers.

    @RCLB It will help if you will tell us which variety of English you are interested in, or whether you are interested in both.

    (What to call the rolling mechanisms at the bottom of the legs is a separate question and off-topic in this thread.
    I'm interested in any English. I just need to know what is this bed in my picture called. People keep saying "box spring" but the one in the photo has no spring at all. It's just a upholstered wooden frame with legs attached (screwed) to it.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    In the fairly recent past, those things in the US always had springs in them, thus most of us still call it a box spring. We aren't going to cut it open or read the manual to see whether there are any springs in it.
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    American English (New England and NYC)
    I'm interested in any English. I just need to know what is this bed in my picture called. People keep saying "box spring" but the one in the photo has no spring at all. It's just a upholstered wooden frame with legs attached (screwed) to it.
    My suggestion is in comment #7.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I'm interested in any English. I just need to know what is this bed in my picture called. People keep saying "box spring" but the one in the photo has no spring at all. It's just a upholstered wooden frame with legs attached (screwed) to it.
    We have told you that the term box spring (certainly in the US)* is typically used for the bottom half of a bed whether it has springs or not. It's a "misleading" name. Like we no longer use actual film or tape to record video or audio, even though it's almost all digital now.

    *Added: a Google image search for box spring (at least when searched within the US) shows most of them no longer have springs.
     
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    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I'm interested in any English. I just need to know what is this bed in my picture called.
    And others have told you that "box spring" is meaningless in BE, so what it is called depends on who you are talking to.
     

    Tegs

    Mód ar líne
    English (Ireland)
    Maybe "bed base" works for all types of English. But it's vague - other things can also be bed bases, not just what's in the photo in #1.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Maybe "bed base" works for all types of English. But it's vague - other things can also be bed bases, not just what's in the photo in #1.
    The box thingy that we most often buy in the US is sold with the mattress as part of a set. It's not a piece of furniture and it doesn't have legs of its own. You need some sort of base to set the box on. Someone not wanting to buy a piece of furniture to go with their "box" and mattress would get a "Hollywood frame" (which sometimes is even included in the price).
    1660078951980.png
     

    Tegs

    Mód ar líne
    English (Ireland)
    Interesting. Divans and other such things here do have little wheels attached and don't need to be placed on top of a third item.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    And so most of us in the US who haven't replaced all our bedroom furniture in the past 10 years for the newest thing, now have bedframes, headboards, footboards, and various other pieces that are all that very low height. If you put a mattress on them, you'd have to literally fall into bed. Regardless of whether they have any function or not, we need those box things to raise the mattress to a usable height.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    I can't be sure, but I believe 'bed base' would be understandable to speakers of American English, if you want to settle on a single term. It's close to 'foundation' which is a term sellers use in advertising. Wiki has an article that may be helpful:

    A bed base, sometimes called a foundation, is the part of a bed that supports the mattress. The bed base can itself be held in place and framed by the bedstead (bed frame). In the United States, box-spring bed bases are very common (to the point where 'bed base' and 'box spring' may be used synonymously, and the term "platform bed" is used for any other type of bed base).​
    (It also contains a complete history of beds from all over the world and as far back as a masonry dated from 3180 BC to about 2500 BC.)
     
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    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Yes, platform bed. Box springs are overwhelmingly common here (although recently lots of new supposedly high-tech beds have come out with completely different designs).

    But, in the old days, if you didn't have a box spring, you might put your mattress on some sort of, often home-built, wooden platform and I would call that a platform bed. Something like this:

    1562681131163.jpeg
     
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