Brace yourself for the worst

antobbo

Senior Member
UK
italian, Italy
Hi peeps, I wonder if this "Brace yourself for the worst" is a commonly used expression among British native speakers please? It sounds correct to me
thanks
 
  • JustKate

    Moderate Mod
    It is not a set expression ("brace yourself for" does not have to be followed by "the worst"), but it makes sense and is grammatically sound.
    I agree that "brace yourself for" doesn't have to be followed by "the worst," but I think it still qualifies as a set expression. It's well known enough in AmE that it's often shortened to simply "Brace yourself," with the "for the worst" part assumed.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Hello antobbo

    Can you tell us how you're thinking of using "Brace yourself for the worst"? In other words, what's the context in which you want to use it?
     

    antobbo

    Senior Member
    UK
    italian, Italy
    thanks guys, the context is somebody that has a bad feeling about something that is about to happen so he braces himself for the worst. But if it isn#t as common as Prepare for the worst, then I will use that
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I suspect that "he braces himself for the worst" would be better than "he prepares for the worst" in your context, antobbo. It's more graphic:).
     
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