bradycardia

mitigate

Member
Ireland, English & Irish
"The gynaecologist was called after detecting the foetus' bradycardia"

or

"The gynaecologist was called after detecting that the foetus was suffering from bradycardia"?


Or, are both okay??
 
  • Isotta

    Senior Member
    English, Hodgepodge
    Well it is ambiguous because you have a participle phrase with an odd modifier. Both of your sentences say that the doctor was called after the same doctor detected bradycardia, which is unlikely unless the action happens to be such. This is odd because he or she would likely have to be there to detect the condition--thus why would the doctor need to be called?

    Z.
     

    mitigate

    Member
    Ireland, English & Irish
    Isotta said:
    Well it is ambiguous because you have a participle phrase with an odd modifier. Both of your sentences say that the doctor was called after the same doctor detected bradycardia, which is unlikely unless the action happens to be such. This is odd because he or she would likely have to be there to detect the condition--thus why would the doctor need to be called?

    Z.

    I see what you mean! Good catch! Another medic detected the problem and called for the gynaecologist. (In context, this was clearer, though I will adjust the sentence now!)

    But my concern was more with "foetus' bradycardia" or "that the foetus was suffering from bradycardia".

    so, "The gynaecologist was called after the foetus' bradycardia was detected" or "The gynaecologist was called after it was detected that the foetus was suffering from bradycardia".

    So, do both these work?
     

    Isotta

    Senior Member
    English, Hodgepodge
    Perhaps, "The gynaecologist was called after bradycardia was detected in the foetus."

    I imagine this is correct because "bradycardia" means "abnormally slow heartbeat." The other two sounded odd to me but may not to a doctor's ears.

    Z.
     

    mitigate

    Member
    Ireland, English & Irish
    Thanks Isotta!

    I think it may be just that! I'm not familiar with the usage of this word and so I am a little unsure.
     
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