brag/proud

Artrella

Banned
BA
Spanish-Argentina
Teacher says there's a difference because you brag when you don't have the thing you brag of, and proud when the thing that makes you proud exists.
Can anybody clarify this subject, please? Art :)
 
  • garryknight

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    Artrella said:
    Teacher says there's a difference because you brag when you don't have the thing you brag of, and proud when the thing that makes you proud exists.
    In that case, I wonder if your teacher brags about her knowledge of English.

    Here's what my Times English dictionary says about "brag":
    1
    To speak of (one's own achievements, possessions, etc) arrogantly and boastfully; 2 boastful talk or behaviour.

    And my Spanish dictionary defines "brag" as jactarse and fanfarronear, neither of which assume that you don't have the thing you brag about (not 'of' :)). Is there a Spanish word which means something similar, but which does imply that you don't have the thing you brag about?

    In my opinion as a native English speaker, bragging involves over-valuing the thing one is bragging about, pretending that it's worth more than it is simply in order to make one seem more important. Or it might involve boasting about something you have that you know the other person doesn't have.

    It's not so much about whether you have the thing about which you brag, it's more about whether you have a right to do so.
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    garryknight said:
    In that case, I wonder if your teacher brags about her knowledge of English.

    Here's what my Times English dictionary says about "brag":
    1
    To speak of (one's own achievements, possessions, etc) arrogantly and boastfully; 2 boastful talk or behaviour.

    And my Spanish dictionary defines "brag" as jactarse and fanfarronear, neither of which assume that you don't have the thing you brag about (not 'of' :)). Is there a Spanish word which means something similar, but which does imply that you don't have the thing you brag about?

    In my opinion as a native English speaker, bragging involves over-valuing the thing one is bragging about, pretending that it's worth more than it is simply in order to make one seem more important. Or it might involve boasting about something you have that you know the other person doesn't have.

    It's not so much about whether you have the thing about which you brag, it's more about whether you have a right to do so.

    Yes, now I see it clearer, it has more to do with the right and not if you actually have or not the thing in question.
    In the BBC page (I have it as home page) I was browsing some time ago, there was this headline "Perez brags about having raped so and so" It seems that a Spaniard had raped and killed a 13-year-old English girl. So I was in doubt because he was bragging about sth he actually "had" he was not inventing anything. Of course not proud of, but as you said "fanfarroneando".
    Sometimes when there is a person who likes to show off or brag about sth, we say "es un chanta"meaning "un charlatán que agranda las cosas, que exagera" when really he hasn't got what he brags about.
    I don't know if I was clear. Hope so, if not ask me. Thanks Garry. And also thanks for the other mail ("I Love You") Hope you are not offended. And I understood everything you explained. I was so enthusiastic about having discovered how to manage these smileys that I went crazy with happiness!!!!
    I like this things...





    Bye Bye, Garry.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    sarinchis said:
    "se cree mucho" is used a lot to refer to someone who is boastful or thinks they are really something great, kind of like bragging. am i right or no??
    Correcto Sarinchis. There is a slang american expression to describe such a person: "He's a legend in his own mind." That is a corruption of the phrase
    "to be a legend in his own time".

    Garry's explanation was great, especially the sarcasm about the teacher.

    She does seem a bit self-important, though not necessarily boastful.
    I don't even know if she suffers from false pride. She is, from reports from the Artistic quarter, a little cocksure.

    Have fun looking up all the slang,

    C
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    sarinchis said:
    "se cree mucho" is used a lot to refer to someone who is boastful or thinks they are really something great, kind of like bragging. am i right or no??
    When I was living in Perú, Peruvians said that we Argentinians were "muy creídos" meaning boastful or braggers (?) In Argentinian terms we ARE "chantas"... :eek:
     

    ant

    Member
    Italy
    here in Italy we have a funny word, fanfarone, for braggart; I'm reading it ought to come from Spanish 'fanfarrón', from 'fanfara' (fanfare, flourish of trumpets)
    -----------------------------------

    oooooops, sorry, you had already said that, sorry...
     

    garryknight

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    cuchufléte said:
    There is a slang american expression to describe such a person: "He's a legend in his own mind." That is a corruption of the phrase "to be a legend in his own time".
    I thought it was "a legend in his own lifetime". Which, over here, gets altered to "He's a legend in his own lunchtime".
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    ant said:
    here in Italy we have a funny word, fanfarone, for braggart; I'm reading it ought to come from Spanish 'fanfarrón', from 'fanfara' (fanfare, flourish of trumpets)
    -----------------------------------

    oooooops, sorry, you had already said that, sorry...
    ANT, whether we kleptomaniac English speakers stole it from Italian or from Spanish, the word is also used in English. I have found a citation for its use as far back as 1622: Fanfaron, "A bllusterer, boaster, braggart, and a Fanfaronade is "boisterous or arrogant language or ostentation.

    Cordiali saluti,
    Cuchu
     

    LadyBlakeney

    Senior Member
    Spain
    Ant, I suppose both the Italian "fanfarone" and the Spanish "fanfarrón" have the same origin. And we also have "fanfara", which in Spanish is "fanfarria".

    I am sorry for using the English Only forum for this, but you know how we get carried away by enthusiasm around here... :)
     

    jacinta

    Senior Member
    USA English
    LadyBlakeney said:
    I am sorry for using the English Only forum for this, but you know how we get carried away by enthusiasm around here... :)
    But, Lady, you have no reason to be sorry. You are "speaking" in English. We can't help sometimes slipping in a foreign word here and there. Especially with words that originate from a foreign language such a fanfaron.
     

    Tormenta

    Senior Member
    Argentina-Español
    Artrella said:
    When I was living in Perú, Peruvians said that we Argentinians were "muy creídos" meaning boastful or braggers (?) In Argentinian terms we ARE "chantas"... :eek:



    Muy creídos? I heard that in Panama, Costa Rica, Nicaragua ,Guatemala, and Spain......wonder why??!! :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :eek:

    We boast about something when : " alardeamos del asunto" ; right?
     

    garryknight

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    Tormenta said:
    Muy creídos?
    When I saw that, I assumed it meant "well thought-of". I know I can translate "I think well of Pedro" as "Tengo muy buena opinión de Pedro", but is there a simple way of saying "Pedro is well thought-of"?
     
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