brain trust

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october15

Senior Member
Portugal-Portuguese
Context:

- Why aren't you in school? Do we need to take you in?
- Winter brake. Brain trust. - said the kid.

Despite the meaning of "brain trust", that is, group of advisers and experts around the president, what do you think the expression means in this context?

My idea: Her brain is also on vacation, so it is probably closed for inventory or something. There's an idiomatic expression in portuguese that applies.

Anyone?

october
 
  • bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    I'm assuming that this is a line from a movie rather than from a novel, seeing as you spelled it "brake" rather than the "break."

    Can you provide further context? What this in a movie or TV show, and, if so, which?
     

    october15

    Senior Member
    Portugal-Portuguese
    I'm assuming that this is a line from a movie rather than from a novel, seeing as you spelled it "brake" rather than the "break."

    Can you provide further context? What this in a movie or TV show, and, if so, which?
    Sorry, I misspelled. It's break.

    This a book. Two cops talking to a sixteen year old girl. She's kind of weird, that's why they tell her she should be at school. It's very close to Christmas, so she is in Christmas brake, only she call's it winter brake, because she's a Goth and doesn't like to celebrate Christmas. There's not much more to say.
    That's the answer she gives them.

    october15
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Sorry, october, if it's a book, I've no idea. Had it been a film you were listening to, I might have ventured a guess at "brain trussed"...
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    By searching "winter break brain trust" I found an excerpt of the text on a website, but it won't allow me post a link.

    In this excerpt the line is punctuated:
    "Winter break, brain trust," said the kid.
    Here, the kid is addressing the cop as "brain trust" and suggesting, of course, that he is no such thing.
     

    october15

    Senior Member
    Portugal-Portuguese
    This is Christopher Moore's novel - You Suck.

    Might be as if saying:

    "Winter break, you smart ass" (that is, dummy) - something like that.
    The fact he uses full stop instead of a comma, makes no difference.

    I see no other relation.
    Anyway, that's totally different from what I first thought. It is a weird methafore, but it makes sense. That's very "Moore-like"

    Thanks.

    october15
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    This is Christopher Moore's novel - You Suck.

    Might be as if saying:

    "Winter break, you smart ass" (that is, dummy) - something like that.
    The fact he uses full stop instead of a comma, makes no difference.
    october15
    Yes, I think you have it. She's saying he's not so smart if he asks a stupid question like that.

    You are right; both punctuations work, but I understood it more easily when I saw the version with the comma.
     

    bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    Actually, I'd say that it would be more like saying "Winter break, genius." The girl is obviously speaking sarcastically.
    Making sure that the correct spelling and punctuation are used is very important, clearly.
     

    october15

    Senior Member
    Portugal-Portuguese
    Actually, I'd say that it would be more like saying "Winter break, genius." The girl is obviously speaking sarcastically.
    Making sure that the correct spelling and punctuation are used is very important, clearly.
    Yep. I've worked that out. In portuguese it has to be a coma.

    Thanks, anyway.

    october15
     
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