brandy in a saucer?!

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Danae

Senior Member
Portuguese - Portugal
Check out this excerpt:

"The waiter took the brandy bottle and another saucer from the counter inside the cafe and marched out to the old man's table. He put down the saucer and poured the glass full of brandy.
"You should have killed yourself last week," he said to the deaf man. The old man motioned with his finger. "A little more," he said. The waiter poured on into the glass so that the brandy slopped over and ran down the stem into the top saucer of the pile."

Do people drink brandy in a glass on top of a saucer? Or didn't I quite understand?...:( Thanks
 
  • cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Hi Danae,

    No, people generally do not put a brandy snifter on a saucer, but from the context you have given, in this instance the brandy glass is on a saucer that is atop at least one other saucer.
     

    moura

    Senior Member
    Portuguese Portugal
    Hi Danae ;)

    Look what I found in the web - this and this. Perhaps the "saucer" is a particular or typical glass or glass term for wine, brandy or champanhe.
    See you
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I think the old man was a sloppy drunk and the saucer was to protect the table or the table cloth.
     

    Danae

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Portugal
    Hi Packard. That's what's more curious: at a given point of the text, the two characters discuss the fact that, although he's drunk, he is a clean drunk 'cause he never spills when drinking...:D Maybe the establishment waiters are just too obsessed with clean tables...:eek: Still, it's strange, unless it is, as Moura says, a type of glass. But it is also suggested that there is a pile of saucers under a main glass and, previously, that the old man slightly taps the glass with the saucer...
     

    Nunty

    Senior Member
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    I believe that in some cafes in Europe (maybe in France?) the way the waiters kept track of how many brandies (or whatever) a person had ordered was by putting a saucer on the table for each one. The saucers were stacked up, but the brandy (or whatever) was not placed on the saucer. When the person was ready to leave, the waiter would count the number of saucers, do the math, and collect the payment. Seems to me that I read that in a Hemingway story or some such.
     

    Danae

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Portugal
    That's an amazing explanation! And I believe that's the answer to my problem. This is indeed a Hemingway's text and th scene develops in Spain, in the early twentieth century, not sure. Thank you for sharing that insight!;)

    I believe that in some cafes in Europe (maybe in France?) the way the waiters kept track of how many brandies (or whatever) a person had ordered was by putting a saucer on the table for each one. The saucers were stacked up, but the brandy (or whatever) was not placed on the saucer. When the person was ready to leave, the waiter would count the number of saucers, do the math, and collect the payment. Seems to me that I read that in a Hemingway story or some such.
     

    liulia

    Senior Member
    English/French
    I believe that in some cafes in Europe (maybe in France?) the way the waiters kept track of how many brandies (or whatever) a person had ordered was by putting a saucer on the table for each one. The saucers were stacked up, but the brandy (or whatever) was not placed on the saucer. When the person was ready to leave, the waiter would count the number of saucers, do the math, and collect the payment. Seems to me that I read that in a Hemingway story or some such.
    I remember reading a novel where the system described by Nun-Translator was used in a bar to keep track of the number of cups of coffee a customer had had. But I cannot remember whether it was all happening in France or in Italy.
     

    Nunty

    Senior Member
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    That's an amazing explanation! And I believe that's the answer to my problem. This is indeed a Hemingway's text and th scene develops in Spain, in the early twentieth century, not sure. Thank you for sharing that insight!;)
    You're reading "A Clean, Well-Lighted Place"? I think that is where I saw it. Yes, it would be Spain, not France.
     

    Nunty

    Senior Member
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    Glad I could help, Danae. I am sure that others would have got there ahead of me if you had attributed the text in the first post. You might want to do so another time. :)
     
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