Brazilian Portuguese and its regional variants

Ayazid

Senior Member
Out of my curiosity: what exactly are differences between various forms of colloquial language in various parts of Brazil? What are differences between them in pronunciation and grammar? For example what is typical for pronunciation in the state Parana and how it is different from the variant spoken in Pernambuco? And what is different for pronunciation in Sao Paulo and how it is different from the pronunciation in Rio Grande do Sul or Minas Gerais? Is the colloquial speech in the Brazilian South influenced by languages of immigrants who came there in the late 19th and 20th century (Italian, German, Spanish, Japanese)? What are influences of African and Indian languages on colloquial Brazilian Portuguese in the Northeast, North and other parts of Brazil? I listen to plenty of Brazilian music (Gilberto Gil, Ivete Sangalo, Caetano Veloso, Daniela Mercury, Carlinhos Brown, João Gilberto), but the singers are usually from the state Bahia so I am not very familiar with another variants of Brazilian Portuguese.
 
  • Márcio Osório

    Senior Member
    Brazil, Brazilian Portuguese
    Hahahahah! Ri pra cachorro, Vanda!

    "Num repara se o berro está sem bala,
    mas é pra não ficar muito pesado."

    @ Ayazid - Big question! What would a Paraná resident say if a Pernambuco resident suddenly started talking away? A question like that seems hard to answer even for an observing linguist. But for one thing, you would not hear that much difference, although I have heard some Rio Grande do Sul speakers complaining they could not understand an A from a Z when they heard Pernambuco speakers talking.

    You gotta come down here and see it for yourself, Ayazid! Do it as soon as you can. From Oiapoque down to Chuí Creek you will not notice that much difference, except for minor entonational differences at least. Some of us would rather have their d's sound hard, some soft. Some load on their s's, some don't.
     

    Vanda

    Moderesa de Beagá
    Português/ Brasil
    I think it's complex to speak about how and when regional variants have begun here. We had so many influences along our history...
    Minas Gerais, for example, was first inhabited by Portugueses that came during the colonial period to explore and work in the mines. At that time the African slaves were here too. During a long time they influenced one another's language besides mixing races, because there weren't many Portuguese women living here. If you visit Ouro Preto nowadays you can notice this strong miscegenation. Then there were also the indians adding to this caldron.
    In Bahia also during colonial times, there were the Portugueses, the African slaves and the local indians. The same story.
    This history changes when we go to the South states. Here Spanish and Portuguese territories were changing from hands for a long period. For a long time these states were inhabited by Portuguese and Spanish people mixed with the local indians. Then, later came the European immigrants: Italian, German (mainly) and many others in small numbers. Till today we can find German colonies in Santa Catarina whose daily language is German; and in the northern part of Rio Grande do Sul, Italian and German colonies.
    In the Northern and Western states remained the biggest concentration of indians that took a longer time to mix.
    So, all of that contributed a great deal to what we are today: a tripod formed by Portuguese, Indians and African and spiced with almost all other peoples spread in Asia and Europe. Our language, customs and culture are the result of this amalgam.
    Migration has had its influence nowadays too. São Paulo is constituted by all Brazilian states inhabitants and so is Rio, in a minor number though.
     

    Ayazid

    Senior Member
    Thanks for the ethnical-historical overview but I would rather like to know differences between various regions as for the pronunciation and grammar. For example, is initial, dubbled and syllable-final [r] pronunciated like in all parts of Brazil? Do all Brazilians say hápido instead of rápido, amoh instead of amor, desehta instead of deserta and guitaha instead of guitarra in all these positions? I remember one songd of Ivete Sangalo - it´s Festa - where the singer says not rock´n´roll but hokinhow, well it sounds hilarious, indeed.
     

    Vanda

    Moderesa de Beagá
    Português/ Brasil
    The overview has to do with what is spoken today.

    ...is initial, dubbled and syllable-final [r] pronunciated like in all parts of Brazil? Do all Brazilians say hápido instead of rápido,....
    in regions with, let's say high Italian and German concentration, for example, people would say rápido. I say hápido, cariocas say hápido...

    I remember one song of Ivete Sangalo - it´s Festa - where the singer says not rock´n´roll but hokinhow, well it sounds hilarious, indeed.

    Yes, everybody says hokinhow, on-lini, selfi servici and so on. We tend, like Italians do, to add a vowel in words where in English this is mute. Normally this vowel is an i (ee).

     
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