BrE "jacket potato" vs AmE "baked potato"

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aquashe

Member
Polish - Poland
Is there any difference between "jacket potato" and "baked potato"?
Is "jacket potato" known only in Britain or in the US too?
Is "baked potato" known in Britain?
<-----Out-of-scope question deleted. Questions about language history may be better suited to the Etymology and History of Languages forum.----->
 
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  • Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    I have never heard the term "jacket potato." In AE, "baked potato" is common. I have heard "baked in their jackets," but probably not in the past 50 years.
     

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    In BE I know both terms and they mean the same thing. Personally I say 'baked potato' but they are equally correct.
     

    Majorbloodnock

    Senior Member
    British English
    In BE I know both terms and they mean the same thing. Personally I say 'baked potato' but they are equally correct.
    Agreed. I might be slightly more likely to use "baked potato" to describe it if it's accompanying a meat and two veg dinner, and more likely to use "Jacket potato" if it's a meal in itself with a filling in it, but even then it's pretty hit and miss.
     

    MuttQuad

    Senior Member
    English - AmE
    "Jackets" or "baked jackets" is very common usage in England, especially for half a baked potato with some topping -- surprisingly to a Yank, baked beans are often used, which would be just about unheard of in the US, where butter, sour cream, and/or chives are most popular.

    I've never heard them called jackets or baked jackets here; but, then there are many differences in food naming between BrE and AmE.
     

    Bevj

    Allegra Moderata (Sp/Eng, Cat)
    English (U.K.)
    I have never heard of 'jackets' or 'baked jackets'.
    I agree with Biffo, personally I say 'baked potato' but 'jacket potato' is also very commonly used.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    In the USA we call the outer portion "skins". They even sell roasted potato skins (usually with cheese and onion inside).

    They are usually called "baked" but I think they are actually roasted.
     

    MuttQuad

    Senior Member
    English - AmE
    Nor me. Nor have I seen them in halves. Here is a typical picture: http://jonoandjules.files.wordpress.com/2013/01/jacket-pots-prawns.jpg
    You just don't eat in the right places. :) I've not only heard of them and seen them, but occasionally eaten such when visiting my English daughter-in-law and English grandchildren. The lunch rooms at Exeter Cathedral and some of the National Trust properties come to mind; but I will admit that it's been some years now, and memory may fail about the particular places of my encounters.

    I do, however, remember the terminology quite clearly, as it seemed so peculiar to my American vocabulary, as did some of the other food delights offered such as baps, Cumberland Swirl, and Spotted Dick.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    The only time I have seen jacket potatoes in the US was when the faux-Australian restaurant Outback Steakhouse used "jacket potatoes" instead of "baked potatoes" on their menu. They stopped doing it some time ago. Waiter: "Would you like a jacket potato with that?" Customer: "Don't you have baked potatoes?" ;)
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Agreed. I might be slightly more likely to use "baked potato" to describe it if it's accompanying a meat and two veg dinner, and more likely to use "Jacket potato" if it's a meal in itself with a filling in it, but even then it's pretty hit and miss.
    I think I would call this a "stuffed baked potato", even if it is cut in halves with a filling placed on top of the halves. I'm not familiar with "jacket potatoes".
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    In the USA we call the outer portion "skins". They even sell roasted potato skins (usually with cheese and onion inside).

    They are usually called "baked" but I think they are actually roasted.
    I believe this is different. Potato skins have the innards removed. :) Jacket potatoes do not, at least according to the linked picture.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    I agree ~ on all counts ~ with the other Britishfolk. My mother-in-law rather quaintly calls them potatoes in their jackets ~ the only person I've ever heard do so. (And she is a bit barmy:D)
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    I agree ~ on all counts ~ with the other Britishfolk. My mother-in-law rather quaintly calls them potatoes in their jackets ~ the only person I've ever heard do so. (And she is a bit barmy:D)
    So basically it means "potatoes with the skins left on" (as opposed to mashed potatoes or something else)?
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    So basically it means "potatoes with the skins left on" (as opposed to mashed potatoes or something else)?
    I suspect ewie assumed we were still only talking about baked potatoes. I sometimes boil potatoes without peeling them (and did so while I still lived in England) but those are not referred to as "in their jackets" - the latter only refers to potatoes baked "with their skins left on".
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    I suspect ewie assumed we were still only talking about baked potatoes. I sometimes boil potatoes without peeling them (and did so while I still lived in England) but those are not referred to as "in their jackets" - the latter only refers to potatoes baked "with their skins left on".
    :):thumbsup:
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Yes, I should have been more specific. I was also thinking about baked potatoes. I guess I was wondering if "jacket" referred to the skin of the baked potato or if the halves of the potato were seen as the jacket for the toppings.
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    Jacket definitely refers to the skin only.

    A major manufacturer of potato crisps (BE; AE: chips) brought out a new variety of crisps some time ago, called "jackets", which were meant to look as though the thin slices had had their skins left on when they went into the deep fryer (I suspect they weren't actually real skins, but they just had dark edges painted on them). Anyway, they devised this clever commercial for them:

    There's this potato slice (with face, arms and legs, animated), and it comes along saying "I'm all peeled and ready to become a Jones (not its real name) Crisp", but is turned back at the factory door by a figure designed to look like a night club bouncer. So away it goes and returns wearing a ghastly black and white checkered sports jacket, but even that is rejected. The slogan was: "You can't get in the packet if you haven't got a jacket." I must say that was pretty good, as these things go.
     
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