break [a grin broke upon his face]

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reza1978

Member
persian-iran
Hi ,please somebody tell me the meaning of this sentence and specially the the meaning of the word " broke":
"a wild grin broke upon his face".well, I know the meaning of" grin =smile" but combined with broke I can not get the meaning.thank you
 
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  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Could you give us the complete sentence and source, please? I believe the word should be "broke" rather than "break."
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Tenses are very important or we wouldn't have them. A complete sentence would still be appreciate, along with the source of your quote – "broke upon" is a little unusual in modern English ... or at least to me.
     

    reza1978

    Member
    persian-iran
    Tenses are very important or we wouldn't have them. A complete sentence would still be appreciate, along with the source of your quote – "broke upon" is a little unusual in modern English ... or at least to me.
    yes tenses are important but here I mean the meaning
    "hearts pounded he gripped his sword .giddy tendrils raced through his gut and a wild grin broke upon his face"
     

    reza1978

    Member
    persian-iran
    I'll ask once more: Source and author, please. These things are also important.
    the source is not an internet source it is in one of the lessons of effortless english course I have it on dvd named first battle by A.J Hoge it is about battle in medieval era .
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    The source doesn't have to be on the Internet – the source is wherever you found it. In this case, "medieval era" tells us a lot about the usage. Even today, we say that someone breaks into a grin ... from the expression they were wearing. So it's not unusual for a person, or a face, to break into a grin or a smile.
     

    reza1978

    Member
    persian-iran
    The source doesn't have to be on the Internet – the source is wherever you found it. In this case, "medieval era" tells us a lot about the usage. Even today, we say that someone breaks into a grin ... from the expression they were wearing. So it's not unusual for a person, or a face, to break into a grin or a smile.
    thanks . then what is the meaning of the sentence? I mean break into smile ?do you mean he started to smile something like that. by the way break into has the same meaning of break upon ?
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    do you mean he started to smile something like that.
    Sort of. It means he suddenly smiled, or changed his expression from an unsmiling one to a smiling one. You wouldn't be likely to use this expression if the person was already looking cheerful to start with (at least I wouldn't).

    by the way break into has the same meaning of break upon ?
    No. It's a set expression in this context. I think of it as the original facial expression breaking up and becoming a smile.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Well, I found it on the Internet, as a pdf - www.gamis-conseil.com/Projet.../3._First%20Battle/First%20Battle.pdf
    The actual text is "a wild grin broke upon my face", and this same text is referred to elsewhere in Wordreference: http://forum.wordreference.com/threads/giddy-tendrils.1146474/ where the question is about "giddy tendrils". The text is also pirated on various English language sites and is a topic in several English language forums.

    "Broke upon" is a bit unusual to me too, but I understand it to mean "a wild grin appeared on my face".
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    Just realised after reading AndyGC's post that "break upon" is used in the words quoted in the OP.

    Reza, please disregard the part in my last post where I said break into and break upon don't mean the same. In this context, "he broke into a grin" and "a grin broke upon his face" mean the same.
     
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