break away, break off, and break up

Silver

Senior Member
Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
If I used to have some friends but later I figure out we cannot even be frinends, I want to end up the relationship with them, can I say:


"I must break away from them and never contact each other any more."
"I must break off from them and never contact each other any more."
I must break up from them and never contact each other any more."


I want to say, I don't want to be friends with them any longer, am I oaky if I use these three phrases, or do you have any good recommendations? Thanks
 
  • timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    If I used to have some friends but later I figure out we cannot even be frinends, I want to end up the relationship with them, can I say:


    "I must break away from them and never contact each other any more."
    "I must break off from them and never contact each other any more."
    I must break up from them and never contact each other any more."


    I want to say, I don't want to be friends with them any longer, am I oaky if I use these three phrases, or do you have any good recommendations? Thanks
    No, because "each other" must go with a plural subject such as "we" "you" or "they". "I" cannot do anything to "each other" - reflexively, "I" can only do something to "myself".
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    Well, it seems, What about put the sense like this:

    I must break away from them and, we never contact each other any more.
    I must break off from them and, we never contact each other any more.
    I must break up from them and, we never contact each other any more.

    I want to know if "the break away, off, up" here works?

    Anyway, thanks
     

    Tazzler

    Senior Member
    American English
    I wouldn't consider #2 in this case. For #2, you could say "with" instead of "from", but that would imply you were in a casual romantic relationship (boyfriend/girlfriend). The only one I would consider correct in this case is #1, but that implies something as well, that your relationship is causing you some harm or hindering you in some way.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    I agree with Tazzler that most people use the first version to express this kind of idea. I'd also accept "break off from them" because I reserve "break up with" for romantic separation in my dialect: I didn't want to break up with her, but she told me to get lost.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top