Break into a passion of tears

< Previous | Next >

panzerfaust0

Senior Member
mandarin
Hello, I was reading a book on Chinese idioms and their English equivalents, and I came across "break into a passion of tears". I looked it up in Google but could not find anything. Basically, the original idiom can be roughly translated as someone crying very loudly, very hard, and with lots of sound, tears, and possibly snot, too. Basically it's crying in a very "big", "complete" way.

My questions:

1. Is "break into a passion of tears" understandable to the average English speakers?
2. Should I use this phrase or simply "bawl one's eyes out"? I want to be understood well by my readers.

Thanks.
 
  • Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    1. Is "break into a passion of tears" understandable to the average English speakers?
    Yes, it is, which is not to say that it's idiomatic.

    We could say 'she broke into passionate tears'.
    2. Should I use this phrase or simply "bawl one's eyes out"? I want to be understood well by my readers.
    You'd be better with the second, provided that bawling is really involved.
     

    panzerfaust0

    Senior Member
    mandarin
    Thanks for the reply Thomas.

    The reason I hesitate to use "bawl one's eyes out" is because I feel that it is slang. I am looking for a non-slangy expression.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I'm guessing "a passion of tears" would be confusing (or just odd) to many American English speakers. I've never heard it before. Passion here almost universally means strong romantic interest or other strong interest/involvement in some topic. I've never heard it used with tears.

    A torrent of tears would make more intuitive sense to me.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    The reason I hesitate to use "bawl one's eyes out" is because I feel that it is slang. I am looking for a non-slangy expression.
    It depends on the context - "to bawl one's eyes out" is usually a little critical of the excessive emotion.
    "She broke/dissolved into floods of [uncontrollable] tears /... into a flood of [uncontrollable] tears" is probably nearer what you want - but context would help.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top