Break it off a bit (popsicle)

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English nerd

Senior Member
Hindi
Is the use of "a bit" natural?

You can break it off a bit.

Someone is eating a popsicle, so another person asks for a small bite. So the person who was eating it says this.

And what about:
Why do we cringe when we break off a popsicle a bit?
Thank you:)
 
  • heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Yes, 'a bit' is natural, but we wouldn't say "You can break it off a bit". We would say "You can break off a bit" Or, more likely "You can break a bit off."
     

    English nerd

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    And can "break off" be used with a spoon? (Brick ice cream)

    And for popsicle: can "bite off " be ised as well?
     

    English nerd

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    For example, you cut off a small slice of ice-cream from an ice-cream brick and is put on a plate. And then a little icream is _____ (broken off/scooped off) at a corner with a spoon.
     
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    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    Same, is the use of "break off" naturally
    I don't understand what you mean by "Same". Are you asking if "break off" is the natural term to use with a popsicle? Heypresto has answered that already. Are you referring to icecream on a plate? I answered that in my last post.
     
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    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    Yes, #4 answers that too. In fact this is probably more likely than "Break a bit off" which implies using your fingers.
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    For example, you cut off a small slice of ice-cream from an ice-cream brick and is put on a plate. And then a little icream is _____ (broken off/scooped off) at a corner with a spoon.
    I agree with Barque: : 'And then a little ice cream is taken off . . . '

    'Broken off' is definitely wrong in this context.
     

    English nerd

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    <Redundant question removed by moderator (Florentia52)>

    Yes, #4 answers that too.
    I know ,Heypresto answered that but I was asking about, how it can be used in a sentence. So I just asked, beacuse Heyresto suggested "a bit off" sounds more natural, so I wanted to ask if it sounds equally natural with "bite off".
    Thank you Barque.:)
    (For answering it)
     
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    English nerd

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    Scooping it off after cutting off a slice(and after putting it on a plate or in a bowl. (With a spoon)

    The ice-cream is cut-off a brick and later eaten with a spoon after transferring it on a plate or in a bowl. So I mean can "scoop off" be used then?(with a spoon)
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    Really. If I was joking I'd have used a smiley, unless the joke was very obvious (in which case you wouldn't have needed to ask "Really?":))

    And what about "scooped off"?
    You asked about "scooped off" in #5. I thought that by suggesting alternatives, I'd indicated it was not a natural choice in your context.

    Have you looked at the definition of "scoop" in the WR dictionary? That can often give you the answers you're looking for.

    scoop (verb): to take up or out with or as if with a scoop*:
    [~ (+ out/up) + object] She scooped (out) some ice cream.
    [~ + object (+ out/up)]scooped some ice cream (out).

    *scoop (noun): a utensil made of a small bowl and a handle, for dishing out ice cream, etc.

    So what about : "Spoon off"? ;)
    No, not in your context.
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    The discussion in this thread has wandered far from the original question, which has received useful answers. Thank you to all who participated. This thread is closed.

    Florentia52, moderator
     
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