Breaking a bone

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sylvio dante

Member
USA
English (US)
How about giving an idea of several ways to say that a person broke a bone? For example "You broke your leg", "He broke his finger", etc. The si, gli, ti, thing drives me pazzo! Would you say "Le e' rotta l'ossa" for "You broke a bone" to a woman (formal)?
 
  • Steno1

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Hi,

    Here below several ways to say "you broke a bone":

    "Hai rotto un osso" (male/female) singular bone
    "Hai rotto le ossa" (male/female) plurar bones ...actually you can use it in fig. when you are struggling in a hard situation and you definitely outdo your challenger.

    "Hai rotto le ossa alla squadra avversaria in quella regata, eh ?"

    "Ti sei rotto/a un osso?" Ti refers to you ( male/female) singular bone
    "Ti sei rotto/a le ossa ?" Ti refers to you (male/female) more bones ...also in fig. sense, when you dipped in tough situation and you ended wholly crushed under the weight

    "Ti sei rotto le ossa in quella gara di decathlon, vero ?"
    or
    "Ti hanno rotto le ossa in quel meeting !"

    " Lei si è rotta un osso!" refers to a woman that has her bone broken, in this case, Si is referred to that bone that she has broken !
    " Lei si è rotta le ossa!" refers to a woman that has her bones broken ( also in fig. )

    Hope this helps!

    Your corrections would be appreciated!

    Steno1
     

    pacman10

    Senior Member
    English-UK
    Hi,

    Here below several ways to say "you broke a bone":

    "Hai rotto un osso" (male/female) singular bone
    "Hai rotto le ossa" (male/female) plurar bones ...actually you can use it in fig. when you are struggling in a hard situation and you definitely outdo your challenger.

    "Hai rotto le ossa alla squadra avversaria in quella regata, eh ?"

    "Ti sei rotto/a un osso?" Ti refers to you ( male/female) singular bone
    "Ti sei rotto/a le ossa ?" Ti refers to you (male/female) more bones ...also in fig. sense, when you dipped in tough situation and you ended wholly crushed under the weight

    "Ti sei rotto le ossa in quella gara di decathlon, vero ?"
    or
    "Ti hanno rotto le ossa in quel meeting !"

    " Lei si è rotta un osso!" refers to a woman that has her bone broken, in this case, Si is referred to that bone that she has broken !
    " Lei si è rotta le ossa!" refers to a woman that has her bones broken ( also in fig. )

    Hope this helps!

    Your corrections would be appreciated!

    Steno1
    I've been searching the forum for simple examples of the grammar of 'si rompere' and found this in my search but am confused by these answers* because they seem to refer partly to figurative or colloquial uses of the verb.

    Referring to individuals who break their leg (in a fall on a ski slope, for example), would the following simple examples be correct ?

    Mi sono rotto la gamba (I broke my leg)
    Si è rotto la gamba (he broke his leg)

    Thanks in advance for any help.

    Paddy

    * My confusion derives partly from the illogical English use of "break" in the context of breaking a bone. In English one might say "I broke my leg" when, in fact, the speaker did not break his/her leg (the leg was broken by the force of an accident, not by the owner of the leg).
     

    Necsus

    Senior Member
    Italian (Italy)
    Referring to individuals who break their leg (in a fall on a ski slope, for example), would the following simple examples be correct ?

    Mi sono rotto la gamba (I broke my leg)
    Si è rotto la gamba (he broke his leg)
    Hi, Paddy. The pronominal verb is rompersi, 'si rompere' doesn't exist. And yes, your examples are correct, because in cases like these we use the pronominal form of verbs instead of possessive pronouns used in English.
     

    pacman10

    Senior Member
    English-UK
    Thanks very much for this rapid and informative answer. Now that I know the keyword is rompersi I can look for that in my grammar book.

    Paddy
     
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