breaking formation

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marymanlio

Member
ITALIAN
Hi,
breaking formation è una frase idiomatica, che magari riguarda l'ambito militare?

Si tratta di un dialogho tra dei soldati durante un'invasione aliena

a:They are breaking formation!!!
b: and coming in hot! Scatter!
 
  • marymanlio

    Member
    ITALIAN
    "rompere le righe"? Forse! ...Rompere la formazione :/
    Grazie ugulamente e scusate per il titolo...la fretta non aiuta
     

    Teerex51

    Senior Member
    Italian, standard
    Ciao Mary, see if this'll work:

    a: attaccano in ordine sparso
    b: ..e con le armi in posizione di sparo. Disperdetevi!

    Coming in hot
    means having pulled the safety off on your weapons, i.e., being ready to fire.
     

    italtrav

    Senior Member
    English
    Ciao a tutti

    2 things:
    a) "breaking formation" isn't an idiomatic phrase. Military troops, planes, ships, tanks, etc. go into a formation, e.g., while traveling. Whenever they then leave the formation, e.g., because they are under attack or because they are about to attack, they "break" formation.
    b) "Coming in hot" can mean a variety of things, one of which is being ready to fire weapons. It could also refer to a damaged plane (or other vehicle) attempting to land (or to make some other sort of arrival) without full control of propulsion, steering, or braking systems.
     

    Teerex51

    Senior Member
    Italian, standard
    Gee, italtrav, that's heady stuff! :rolleyes: And I'm a sucker for constructive criticism...
    So, if "breaking formation" is not an idiom, why did you put "break" between quotation marks?
    And what translation would you then recommend, seeing as you're an authority on these matters? :D
     

    italtrav

    Senior Member
    English
    Ciao T
    Right. An authority.:cool:

    I put "break" into quotes to indicate the term that I was discussing at that point. I didn't call it idiomatic because it is an ordinary use of the term—most anything in English that is put together may be broken apart—but I'm aware that I used the narrower meaning of "idiom," which indicates a more specialized or non-obvious expression, e.g., to break a news story, to break bread (meaning, to share a meal with someone), to give someone a break. I'm not sure of a translation into Italian, as I have no idea what Italian military pilots say when they see an enemy flying in formation and then abandoning the formation as prelude to an attack. From the limited context, I'd say that "coming in hot" here means "about to fire," but I don't know that "stanno per tirare" has much flavor to it.

    While we're at it—I'd love to see a list of Italian military commands, starting with those used to give orders for marching, like the ones here on Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drill_commands. I've looked around a little on threads here, but I didn't see much of anything.
     
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