Breeze, broze, brizen

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Soob

Senior Member
Hi,

Today while reading some hip-hop lyrics I came upon a quite interesting form of a word "breeze". It was used as a verb, which means "to leave" etc.

The lyrics go:
I rose, wiping the blunt's ash from my clothes
Then froze only to blow the herb smoke through my nose
And told my little man I'm ghost, I broze


Someone wrote that in slang the word breeze is conjugated(?) as "breeze", "broze", "brizen". It's obviously a mistake and there's no such a conjunction, but I would like to ask you, is it popular and well-known among native speakers? Have you ever met with this phrase? Would you understand if someone said "he broze ten minutes ago?" or is this just a very narrow-group-related term.
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    It's obviously a mistake and there's no such a conjunction, but I would like to ask you, is it popular and well-known among native speakers?
    No.

    Have you ever met with this phrase?
    No.

    Have you ever met with this phrase? Would you understand if someone said "he broze ten minutes ago?" or is this just a very narrow-group-related term.
    I doubt that this odd conjugation is used in any group. I'd say that the songwriter was searching for something that rhymed with "nose" and "froze". It's hard to overestimate the importance of rhyme in hip-hop lyrics. A strong desire to rhyme may lead songwriters to use something that has no real meaning in English.

    Cross-posted with Glen.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    is it popular and well-known among native speakers?
    No.
    Have you ever met with this phrase?
    No.
    Would you understand if someone said "he broze ten minutes ago?"
    No. I wouldn't even understand if someone said He breezed ten minutes ago. (I'd take that to mean "He farted gently or discreetly":rolleyes:)

    I wish (in idle moments) that non-native speakers everyone would realize that the 'English' of rap very often has very little to do with actual real English as spoken by anyone.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    And told my little man I'm ghost, I broze

    Someone wrote that in slang the word breeze is conjugated(?) as "breeze", "broze", "brizen".
    It is a joke/witticism that a lot of native speakers have made or heard: it is the incorrect conjugation of a strong/irregular verb in a way that mimics another verb:

    Drink - drank - drunk -> sink - sank -sunk ---> think - thank - thunk.

    Drive - drove - driven ---> breeze", "broze", "brizen"
     
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