breeze caresses the fishing pole [caress?]

Sun14

Senior Member
Chinese
Hello, my friends,

I was wondering whether caress is idiomatic in the sentence:

"The gentle sea breeze caresses the fishing pole of the old people."

Thoughts: This is a kind of literary writing: The sea breeze gently blows the fishing pole of the old people.
 
  • Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    Two problems: "people" (plural) would surely have more than just a singular "pole." And how does a breeze blow (or caress) a fishing pole? I just can't imagine it, or wanting to say it.

    You could use the verb caress in something like "The gentle sea breeze caressed her face." But your sentence about the fishing pole (which I call a fishing rod, anyway) is bizarre.
     

    AmaryllisBunny

    Senior Member
    I agree with Glenfarclas...

    Caress
    has a sensual note. Unless there is a close/special relationship between the speaker/writer and their fishing poles, it (the use of caress) is not appropriate.
     

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Two problems: "people" (plural) would surely have more than just a singular "pole." And how does a breeze blow (or caress) a fishing pole? I just can't imagine it, or wanting to say it.

    You could use the verb caress in something like "The gentle sea breeze caressed her face." But your sentence about the fishing pole (which I call a fishing rod, anyway) is bizarre.
    Get it. Thus shall I just use "gently blow"?
     

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I agree with Glenfarclas...

    Caress
    has a sensual note. Unless there is a close/special relationship between the speaker/writer and their fishing poles, it (the use of caress) is not appropriate.
    Thank you very much. Is there a appropriate term you can think of.
     

    Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    I'm just not sure why you would want to comment on the effect of the wind upon somebody's fishing rod. And I think it would take a pretty stiff wind to have a noticeable effect anyway. Maybe:

    "A sudden, violent gust blew the fishing rod right out of the old man's hands."
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    In your mind what action does the breeze have on the pole? Once we know that, we can make informed suggestions.

    A wind can bend a sapling and I would imagine it could do so to a pole.

    A breeze can make something flutter or vibrate. We need a bit more information.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Speaking as a curmudgeonly old fisherman and not an aficionado of effusive poetic writing, I see the effort as being over the top.

    I had a great fishing trip this past Friday and if I had said something to my companions such as "Gee the wind is caressing my fishing pole," they would have thought me to be rather weird.
     
    Last edited:

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Speaking as a curmudgeonly old fisherman and not an aficionado of effusive poetic writing, I see the effort as being over the top.

    I had a great fishing trip this past Friday and if I had said something to my companions as "Gee the wind is caressing my fishing pole," they would have thought me to be rather weird.

    But the wind could make your fishing line hum, no? I agree that "caressing" sounds a bit over the top.
     
    Last edited:

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I'm just not sure why you would want to comment on the effect of the wind upon somebody's fishing rod. And I think it would take a pretty stiff wind to have a noticeable effect anyway. Maybe:

    "A sudden, violent gust blew the fishing rod right out of the old man's hands."
    Since it will be written on a tourist brochure, I want to emphasize the tender soft side of the wind and write it this way.

    In your mind what action does the breeze have on the pole? Once we know that, we can make informed suggestions.

    A wind can bend a sapling and I would imagine it could do so to a pole.

    A breeze can make something flutter or vibrate. We need a bit more information.
    I want to write it on a tourist brochure and suggest the soft side of the breeze and the peaceful life there.

    Speaking as a curmudgeonly old fisherman and not an aficionado of effusive poetic writing, I see the effort as being over the top.

    I had a great fishing trip this past Friday and if I had said something to my companions such as "Gee the wind is caressing my fishing pole," they would have thought me to be rather weird.
    What if it is written in a tourist brochure?
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    For the sort of soft action of the breeze that Sun wants to describe, "sway" is a useful word because it can be used both for the action of the wind on something and for the movement caused by the wind.

    The branches sway in the soft breeze.
    The soft breeze sways the branches.

    If the wind or breeze "caresses" something (your cheeks, for example) it doesn't move them or make them sway. The image of a pole being caressed is slightly comic I'm afraid. Then again, the caressing breeze probably isn't strong enough to make fishing rods sway.

    If you are describing something you have seen, do you want to show that the poles are being swayed or blown about? If so, you may need to talk about 'gusts of wind'. "Caress" is static and too gentle for your context.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    "Something caressing poles" is really not an image you want to use, you don't know what it might give rise to.

    Sway is definitely a safer option.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    For the travel brochure I think the effect on the fishing pole is irrelevant. It is the pole's holder that is of interest.

    So you might want to address the breeze to the fisherman.


    While fishing you will frequently find that a gentle breeze will keep you comfortable even under the direct sun.
     

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    For the travel brochure I think the effect on the fishing pole is irrelevant. It is the pole's holder that is of interest.

    So you might want to address the breeze to the fisherman.


    While fishing you will frequently find that a gentle breeze will keep you comfortable even under the direct sun.
    Get it. Thank you very much.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    What if you aren't fishing, or don't fish? I suppose you are really writing about the pleasant climate, but surely there isn't a soft/gentle/cooling breeze all the time? Breezes make leaves rustle in trees, they make the girls' skirts, and flags, flutter. Cool breezes waft the delicious odours of your fresh caught fish cooking for dinner under .... ,oh gosh, it must be infectious.

    Just write simple, factual English. :)
     

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    What if you aren't fishing, or don't fish? I suppose you are really writing about the pleasant climate, but surely there isn't a soft/gentle/cooling breeze all the time? Breezes make leaves rustle in trees, they make the girls' skirts, and flags, flutter. Cool breezes waft the delicious odours of your fresh caught fish cooking for dinner under .... ,oh gosh, it must be infectious.

    Just write simple, factual English. :)
    Get. Thank you very much.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top