Brian has a lot of skills/abilities. Some people may need his skills/abilities.

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wolfbm1

Senior Member
Polish
Hello.
"A skills exchange is where one person offers a particular skill or service in exchange for another skill or service from someone else. It is like a 'swap shop' for skills /services."
"In this lesson, Ss <= students> discuss other people's abilities and needs in the context of a Skills Exchange Service."
Source: Fiona Gallagher. New Total English Elementary Teacher's Book. Pearson Education.

The lesson presents a few notices from a Skills Exchange Service in Barton. The notices contain information about what some people can do, what they actually do for a living, what they like, their names and telephone numbers, as well as what skills or services they need. For example, what Brian Winter can do is repair cars, engines, houses and computers. He loves computers. He makes furniture in wood and metal. He hates to clean his big house. He needs a cleaner.
There is also a conversation between an interviewer and Lizie. He asks her if she has any special abilities. She answers that she can play a lot of diffeent sports: football, basketball and tennis. When asked what her practical skills are she says that she is a good cook and that she likes cleaning and housework. She doesn't understand computers and needs someone who can repair her laptop.

1. Brian has a lot of skills. Some people may need his skills.
2. Brian has a lot of abilities. Some people may need his abilities.

I think I can say sentence 1. Is it OK to say sentence 2?

Thank you.
 
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  • Chacraft3

    Member
    Russian
    Well, Actually If you want to explain to someone about the meaning of ability you could explain it so: have got a skill to do something - which can make a sense now.Skills and abilities are synonymic and they also could be synonymous with something other.But we also have another way to explain - Skill also means the qualification to do something that is about your job/work.So if a skill is an alike expertise and an ability is alike possibility we could take an answer.
    1)If we are going to talk about someone who is a doer or master, professor, teacher - we'd say One's skilled
    2) If we are going to talk about someone who is talented but not about one's job, presumably, we're talking about adults - we'd say that the adults are talented or in their abilities.
    So, you chose the right one.I don't think that someone wants to need his abilities they might want to develop his abilities.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Sentence #1 is fine. Sentence #2 Brian has a lot of abilities (Brian is very able) is less informative, and might be misleading. We often talk about an "ability" in the physical sense. In any case, we wouldn't use "abilities" here: Some people may need his abilities skills.

    It's fine to talk about a specific ability:
    His ability to repair cars makes him very popular with the other members of this exchange service.

    ability - WordReference.com Dictionary of English
    skill - WordReference.com Dictionary of English
     

    wolfbm1

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Thank you for the collocations. :)
    How about this pair of sentences?
    3. His skill of repairing computers is what Lizzie needs.
    4. His ability to repair computers is what Lizzie needs.

    Sentence #4 does not sound good, does it.
     
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    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Your sentences seem to imply that Lizzie needs to acquire these skills herself, but I don't think that's what you mean.

    Lizzie needs someone with computer-repairing skills.
    Lizzie needs someone with the ability to repair computers.
     

    wolfbm1

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Your sentences seem to imply that Lizzie needs to acquire these skills herself, but I don't think that's what you mean.

    Lizzie needs someone with computer-repairing skills.
    Lizzie needs someone with the ability to repair computers.
    Yes. My sentences are ambiguous.
    Your sentences are similar in meaning. The difference is that the word "computer-repairing skills" tells us that someone is proficient at repairing computers, and the phrase "ability to repair computers"that someone is capable of repairing computers.
    Is that correct?
     
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