bride and groom in one word

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Surinam del Nord

Senior Member
Español - España
Hello,

is there any single word who contains both the couple "bride and groom", the same way that "siblings" contains "brothers and sisters"?

Thanks a lot.
 
  • Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    A man and a woman who seem more or less together are called a couple.

    If they are just married, it's common to call them the happy couple. The adjective has nothing to do with whether they are happy or not; it just refers to their newly-married condition. They cease being the happy couple once the honeymoon is over, when they become a married couple.
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    However there doesn't seem to be a singular word meaning "bride or groom". After the ceremony you can say 'newlywed': each newlywed posed for a photograph with the other's family. But each . . . arrived in a white Daimler? I can't think of one.
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    However there doesn't seem to be a singular word meaning "bride or groom". After the ceremony you can say 'newlywed': each newlywed posed for a photograph with the other's family. But each . . . arrived in a white Daimler? I can't think of one.
    We were not asked for such a word, Entangled. We were asked for a single word which contains both the couple "bride and groom", the same way that "siblings" contains "brothers and sisters"?
     

    Gwan

    Senior Member
    New Zealand, English
    We were not asked for such a word, Entangled. We were asked for a single word which contains both the couple "bride and groom", the same way that "siblings" contains "brothers and sisters"?
    I think the point was that you can use the terms 'bride' and 'groom' before the wedding, but you can't use 'newlywed' before the wedding. So effectively a pre-wedding replacement for 'bride and groom' doesn't exist (as far as we can recall).
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I think the point was that you can use the terms 'bride' and 'groom' before the wedding, but you can't use 'newlywed' before the wedding. So effectively a pre-wedding replacement for 'bride and groom' doesn't exist (as far as we can recall).
    But we do talk of a bride and a groom before the ceremony itself. Or we might say the bride-to-be if we wanted to be very pernickety, I suppose.
     

    Gwan

    Senior Member
    New Zealand, English
    But we do talk of a bride and a groom before the ceremony itself. Or we might say the bride-to-be if we wanted to be very pernickety, I suppose.
    Exactly. We can say 'bride' before the wedding, we can say 'groom' but before the wedding we can't replace these individual terms with a collective one like 'newlywed' (unless anyone has any suggestions).
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Exactly. We can say 'bride' before the wedding, we can say 'groom' but before the wedding we can't replace these individual terms with a collective one like 'newlywed' (unless anyone has any suggestions).
    The problem is, I think, Gwan, that we understand different things by a collective term. I'd say that we were short of a term to describe the individual in his or her new condition. For me a collective term means a term to describe a collection, i.e. more than one, of something. That's why I was happy with couple + an adjective.

    Maybe I'm out on a limb in this.
     

    Surinam del Nord

    Senior Member
    Español - España
    Well, what I was asking about, and if I've been ambiguous it's because of my limited knowledge of English, is a word that's suitable just the same for the male and for the female part of a couple.

    Thank you all.

    (So it has to be more with sex or genre than with number.)

    But it has been useful to me to learn how they're called the couples when getting married.

    And about the happy couple, yes, I got the point. I was just failing to make a joke.
     

    Gwan

    Senior Member
    New Zealand, English
    The problem is, I think, Gwan, that we understand different things by a collective term. I'd say that we were short of a term to describe the individual in his or her new condition. For me a collective term means a term to describe a collection, i.e. more than one, of something. That's why I was happy with couple + an adjective.

    Maybe I'm out on a limb in this.
    Ah, I see what you mean. Yes, since 'newlywed' can be singular or plural it might be playing a bit fast and loose with the meaning of 'collective' to call it a collective term. I just meant a term that could equally describe either party (bride or groom) or both.

    'Young couple' works, but of course isn't specific to married or about-to-be married couples.

    As for betrothed, I think you might be right shawnee, I can't quite say it to myself without putting on a hammy voice.
     

    AngelEyes

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    It's not one word, but wedding couple is a fixed term that can only refer to the bride and groom.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I think those who think "betrothed" is an archaic term need to check current usage.
    Click HERE.
    That looks like more than 100 media examples within November.

    It may be archaic, but then we are inclined to use archaic/traditional language in this context.
     

    kalamazoo

    Senior Member
    US, English
    "Betrothed" is still pretty archaic and would hardly be used in speech today, especially as a noun. You might say "My sibling has a problem with that" or "My sister has a problem with that" but would be much less likely to say "The betrothed has a problem with that" than you would be to say "The bride has a problem with that." Also I blame Kate and William for a lot of the recent usage anyway.
     

    hippohippo

    Senior Member
    English
    I find it jaw-dropping to read that anyone can feel that 'betrothed' is not used much today. Looking at the comments I think we should all accept that while some people find it current, there are clearly an equal number who think it's something akin to 'gadzooks.'
     

    kalamazoo

    Senior Member
    US, English
    It's current in the newspaper, probably in part because it's shorter to say X and Y are betrothed than to say X and Y are engaged to be married, but it's rarely used in speech to the best of my knowledge. Probably you hear it about as often as you hear gadzooks though!
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    I believe I would say "the betrothed" before I would say "my sibling and I".

    How about "fiancé(e)" (the "(e)" is silent), or something like "spouse-to-be" or "newlywed-to-be"?
     
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