Bring home the miracle

  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    It means brings the miracle home -- presumably you can bring a miracle haircare product home with you (what a concept). The underlying message is simple: Buy this haircare product.

    The product is L'Oreal Total Repair 5 Serum, and rather than being a shampoo, it's a serum that you use three drops of after shampooing when your hair is dry to repair your hair. The woman in the advertising is Aishwarya Rai ... who is nearly always deserving of a link and accuracy in reporting the context. Since you're posting from India, you of all people should know she's not "simply a girl." :rolleyes:
     

    kanu

    Senior Member
    But sir when we write
    He has brought home the curtains = He has brought the curtains for home
    It wont mean , He has brought the curtains to home.

    It means brings the miracle home -- presumably you can bring a miracle haircare product home with you (what a concept). The underlying message is simple: Buy this haircare product.

    The product is L'Oreal Total Repair 5 Serum, and rather than being a shampoo, it's a serum that you use three drops of after shampooing when your hair is dry to repair your hair. The woman in the advertising is Aishwarya Rai ... who is nearly always deserving of a link and accuracy in reporting the context. Since you're posting from India, you of all people should know she's not "simply a girl." :rolleyes:
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    But sir when we write
    He has brought home the curtains = He has brought the curtains for home
    This is not true.
    He has brought home the curtains = He has brought the curtains home (to the place we call home).
    It wont mean , He brought the curtains to home.
    That's exactly what it does mean.

    When we say we have brought the curtains for home, it means we have brought them for use in the home.
     

    kanu

    Senior Member
    My father brought me an amazing gift = My father brought me an amazing gift for me.
    We are using "for" here
    This is not true.
    He has brought home the curtains = He has brought the curtains home (to the place we call home).


    That's exactly what it does mean.

    When we say we have brought the curtains for home, it means we have brought them for use in the home.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    My father brought me an amazing gift = My father brought me an amazing gift for me.
    We are using "for" here
    It's not the same thing because of "gift," which has the implicit meaning that it is for you, as well as to you.

    My father brought me a hamster. (He brought it to me -- and then he told me to give it to my sister. It wasn't for me.)
     

    kanu

    Senior Member
    you mean to say
    My father brought me a hamster. (meant for my sister) but we skip this thing & hamster was meant for me then we will say the same sentence ?
    My father brought me a hamster = My father brought a hamster for me.
    as well as My father brought a hamster to me.
    It's not the same thing because of "gift," which has the implicit meaning that it is for you, as well as to you.

    My father brought me a hamster. (He brought it to me -- and then he told me to give it to my sister. It wasn't for me.)
     
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    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    you mean to say
    My father brought me a hamster. (meant for my sister) but we skip this thing & hamster was meant for me then we will say the same sentence ?
    My father brought me a hamster = My father brought a hamster for me.
    as well as My father brought a hamster to me.
    I'm not trying to create a hard and fast rule here, but in general I think you can view "bring" as the transport. If there's a sense of "ownership" (for me), then it will be understood or implied or stated.

    My father brought me a hamster. (It's my birthday, so he not only transported the animal and handed it to me, but it now belongs to me.)
    My father brought me a hamster. He said I could give it to my sister as a present because I couldn't think of anything for her birthday. (Meaning is obvious.)

    Talking to a veterinarian:
    I brought you a sick horse. (He's out in the trailer and I need the doctor to look at him. There is no sense that I'm giving the vet my horse.)
    I brought you a dead horse. (A week ago you said you could cure him but you didn't and he died. He's of no use to me and I think you're a quack and I brought him over here because I'm giving him to you. He's on your front lawn.)

    So ... it's all about context and shared understanding. Sometimes brought will mean transported and given for you to keep, or for your benefit. Sometimes it will mean transported only.

    I don't suppose there's any chance we could get back to Aishwarya Rai? :)
     
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    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Kanu, simply accept the fact that you were mistaken. The expression "bring something home" does not necessarily mean that the item brought was intended for the home. It means that you brought it to your house.

    John wrote a poem for his girlfriend, and took it to her house, but she was not there, so he brought his girlfriend's poem home with him.
    I had to read a report for work. I could not finish reading it in my office, so I brought it home in order to read it there.
     
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    kanu

    Senior Member
    If I say Bring me a sandwitch it will mean Bring sandwitch to me​ ?
    I'm not trying to create a hard and fast rule here, but in general I think you can view "bring" as the transport. If there's a sense of "ownership" (for me), then it will be understood or implied or stated.

    My father brought me a hamster. (It's my birthday, so he not only transported the animal and handed it to me, but it now belongs to me.)
    My father brought me a hamster. He said I could give it to my sister as a present because I couldn't think of anything for her birthday. (Meaning is obvious.)

    Talking to a veterinarian:
    I brought you a sick horse. (He's out in the trailer and I need the doctor to look at him. There is no sense that I'm giving the vet my horse.)
    I brought you a dead horse. (A week ago you said you could cure him but you didn't and he died. He's of no use to me and I think you're a quack and I brought him over here because I'm giving him to you. He's on your front lawn.)

    So ... it's all about context and shared understanding. Sometimes brought will mean transported and given for you to keep, or for your benefit. Sometimes it will mean transported only.

    I don't suppose there's any chance we could get back to Aishwarya Rai? :)
     
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