Bring it on

  • Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    It's a difficult phrase to translate without additional context. For Portuguese, here are a few possibilities, along with closer translations of their meaning:

    Venham eles. Let them come.
    Eles que venham/tentem/experimentem. Let them come/try.
    Pois que venham. Let them (try and) come.
    Experimentem. Let them try (it).
    Vamos a isso. Let's go for it.
     

    blue_jewel

    Senior Member
    Filipino/Tagalog
    Thank you for the translations Outsider.

    As for my usage, it is something we usually say to challenge a rival or an opponent.


    or something to that effect.
     
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    Mahaodeh

    Senior Member
    Arabic, PA and IA.
    I'm not sure if I understood the context correctly, I think this works in Arabic:

    أعلى ما في خيلك أركبه = [try to] ride the the highest (tallest/biggest) of your horses; used to say something like "I don't care and I'm not afraid of you, do something about it if you can". Just a guess, this might have originated in battle or horse races.

    Less common is (روح) بلط البحر = (go) pave the ocian [if you can]. But this is used mostly when you know that your opponent can't do anything; it's like saying "tough luck, live with it".

    Youths (mostly male teenagers) might say: لو رجال/راجل/زلمة تعال = if you are a man come. this phrase usually ends up with a fist fight.

    I hope I understood what is meant in the thread.
     
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    Frank06

    Senior Member
    Nederlands / Dutch (Belgium)
    Hi,

    In Dutch it could be something as "Laat maar komen".
    Backtranslated to English this gives (more or less literally) "let/have it come".
    I think that the Dutch phrase can also used in the context you gave, namely, in the context of challenging a rival or an opponent.

    Groetjes,

    Frank
     

    Kangy

    Senior Member
    Argentina [Spanish]
    Thank you for the translations Outsider.

    As for my usage, it is something we usually say to challenge a rival or an opponent.


    or something to that effect.
    In that case, the most natural phrases in Spanish I can think of right now are:
    • ¡Que venga! (1 opponent)
    • ¡Que vengan! (more than 1 opponent)
     

    Armas

    Senior Member
    Finnish
    Finnish: Anna tulla! "let come!". I think we could use "show me what you can" too (näytä mihin pystyt).
     
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