bring on

VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
The next player was brought on just before play ended for the day
(a Russian dictionary)
The other team will have to bring on a substitute as one of their players can hardly walk.
phrasal verb exercises

I wonder if one really can use the verb 'bring on' in this meaning. I haven't seen such use in dictionaries.
Thank you.
 
  • VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    "Bring on" isn't exactly wrong, but I would probably say "bring out" instead. I think it also depends on the sport that's being discussed.
    Do you mean 'bring out' as a verb + a preposition, not as a phrasal verb? (I haven't found such meaning of 'bring out', too...)
     

    Sabretooth

    Senior Member
    American English
    Do you mean 'bring out' as a verb + a preposition, not as a phrasal verb? (I haven't found such meaning of 'bring out', too...)
    It's more like sports jargon, really. To "bring out" a substitute would mean to bring a substitute out onto the field/ice/court, depending on the sport. I would choose "bring out" for that reason, since you don't bring a substitute in the field/ice/court.

    Does that make sense?
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    It's more like sports jargon, really. To "bring out" a substitute would mean to bring a substitute out onto the field/ice/court, depending on the sport. I would choose "bring out" for that reason, since you don't bring a substitute in the field/ice/court.

    Does that make sense?
    .
    But no one is talking about 'bring in':)
    You said: "to bring a substitute out onto the field/ice/court".
    = bring out onto the field/ice/court,
    so, you consider 'out' to be more important than 'onto'.
    But if we omit 'out' instead, we get "bring onto the field/ice/court" = "bring on to the field/ice/court" = "bring on the field/ice/court"
    I'm doubting this (my) reasoning has a sense, though:D

    Thank you.
     
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