bring the roof down

burkuu

Senior Member
turkish
Hi everybody

This phrasal verb is causing big trouble to me :) The sentence goes like this: "These cars had really brought the roof down" (Cars are cabrios)

Thanks in advance
Burcu
 
  • Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I'm sure biblio's right that it's a reference to "bring the house down".

    As the cars are cabriolets, I suspect it's a play on words:)
     

    longxianchen

    Senior Member
    chinese
    But it doesn't make sense, as "something popular with audience", in the following words from the novel, Laddy Chatterley's Lover:
     "This was more or less Constance Chatterley's position. The war had brought the roof down over her head. And she had realised that one must live and learn."
    I think "brought the roof down" here has different meaning, maybe meaning "brought a disaster" over her head. Is that right?
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    This is the earlier meaning of "bring the roof down". You will note the last line of the preceding paragraph:
    We’ve got to live, no matter how many skies have fallen.

    This was more or less Constance Chatterley’s position. The war had brought the roof down over her head. And she had realized that one must live and learn.
    "when the sky falls" (and "when the heavens fall") mean when there is a very serious disaster in your life. It seems that the author uses "the roof" (which is a smaller covering than the sky) to mean something a little less than very serious but nevertheless unpleasant.
     
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