bringing a zip-lock bag with food

redgiant

Senior Member
Cantonese, Hong Kong
I get kinda peckish around 10:00 A.M. and have been bringing a small zip-lock snack bag with about a half dozen baby carrots and a half dozen cherry tomatoes to work.

http://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/showthread.php?p=14915633
Background: This is taken from a post with a recommendation of a healthy and filling breakfast that can tide one over until noon.

Do you consider this modified structure "bringing a half dozen baby carrots... in a small zip-lock snack bag" as common as the original one? Thanks
 
  • Lyndon

    Banned
    N/A
    Your question is not very clear -- you quote a structure and ask if it's as common as ... (what ???)
     

    redgiant

    Senior Member
    Cantonese, Hong Kong
    Sorry for the confusing question. Here's my another attempt:

    Original one:
    bringing a small zip-lock snack bag with about a half dozen baby carrots and a half dozen cherry tomatoes

    My version:
    bringing a half dozen baby carrots and a half dozen cherry tomatoes in a small zip-lock snack bag

    Do you think my version is as common as the original?
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I think the question asks: Can we mention the vegetables* before the bag, as in the modified structure, as well as after it, as in the original?

    In my opinion: Yes, we can. It sounds equally natural either way. In fact, I prefer the modified structure: it puts the emphasis on the food that the speaker brings to work, not on its container.

    Added in edit: Cross-posted with the clarification, but it seems that I understood the question correctly.

    ______________________
    *It is not necessary to point out that a tomato is, botanically, a fruit. I know that.
     

    redgiant

    Senior Member
    Cantonese, Hong Kong
    Thanks Egmont. Before posting this question, I also thought the original structure was a "clang" to me because of the emphasis on the zip-lock bag.
     

    Lyndon

    Banned
    N/A
    Do you mean ... is "bring a bag with X" more common than "bring X in a bag" ?
    I have no idea which is more common, and I doubt if anyone else could tell you which is more common. Both are perfectly normal, idiomatic ways of expressing the idea.

    It would also be quite possible to say "... have been bringing about a half dozen baby carrots and a half dozen cherry tomatoes to work" and leave it to the reader's intelligence to understand that they were probably in a container, not in the back pocket of your jeans. :rolleyes: :cool:


    P.S. In my English I would add 'in' --> "bring a bag with X in", and I would say "about half a dozen ...".


    EDIT:
    P.S.2: I would ask what a 'clang' is, if I weren't scared of the reply.
    Let me just say that I have never heard of it as a generally accepted grammatical term.
     
    Last edited:

    Lyndon

    Banned
    N/A
    Yep, that's exactly the thread I was scared of seeing.

    Interesting that you picked that word out of that thread, but you didn't pick up on the almost-universal condemnation of it. :)
     
    Last edited:
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