bringing in the stripper pole

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VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
Two sisters are searching through their father's girlfriend's drawers, and find some underwear and dressing that looks sexy or something.
-- God, when are they bringing in the stripper pole?
-- I know, she's like a crack whore without the dignity.
The Uninvited, movie

That means: "It's obvious she's a striptease performer, so it's reasonable to expect that they (she and our father) one day are going to bring her stripper pole to the house, too." (I understand it was a joke of course)

Am I right?
Thanks.
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It means they associate that kind of skimpy underwear with a pole dancer, hence the remark. Yes, it's a joke. Presumably she's not actually a stripper at all.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Yes, that's why I said "(I understand it was a joke of course)":)

    Just one question to be sure: "the stripper pole" refers to the particular pole that she's using when performing, right?
     

    Sparky Malarky

    Moderator
    English - US
    Yes, that's why I said "(I understand it was a joke of course)":)

    Just one question to be sure: "the stripper pole" refers to the particular pole that she's using when performing, right?
    Yes.

    Why did they say "...the stripper pole" instead of "...a stripper pole"? It's kind of like they're saying "When will they bring in the stripper pole; we can see that it's certain they will get one."
     

    Sparky Malarky

    Moderator
    English - US
    No, not wrong. "...a stripper pole" would have worked as well. But the phrasing, "...the stripper pole," emphasizes that they are certain a pole is to come.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Am I missing something here? :confused:

    — God, when are they bringing in the stripper pole?

    The use of "the" in this line is purely stylistic/colloquial. The joke would fall flat as a pancake if you said "a stripper pole"! Most such expressions use the definite article:

    Cue the music! Bring on the dancing girls!
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Hmmm... As I've understood, "the" indicates that a stripper pole is a necessary attribute that a woman like Rachel is expected to have (or be associated with).
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    A woman like Rachel? You mean the girlfriend of some daft teenage girl's dad? (I'm guessing about the teenage bit! :))

    But she's not a pole dancer. It's a joke. She simply wears skimpy underwear.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    You mean the girlfriend of some daft teenage girl's dad?
    I mean a woman that wears that kind of undergarment/underclothing (rather than underwear, to be more precise). No matter what kind of woman she really is, for Anna that was enough to say that. Or maybe not only that. They hear her scream at nights when she's having sex with their father. And they hate her at all:)
     
    Last edited:

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I don't know the storyline. But it's still a joke, surely? Maybe a cruel one, but that's another matter.

    (What's the difference between underwear and undergarments/underclothing?)
     

    srk

    Senior Member
    English - US
    The joke would fall flat as a pancake if you said "a stripper pole"! Most such expressions use the definite article:

    Cue the music! Bring on the dancing girls!
    Expressions that imitate stage direction certainly do. I don't know the rules for jokes that start with "When," made while digging through drawers. "Flat as a pancake" is a terrible exaggeration. It's pretty much a flat joke as it is, and it would survive intact with "a" as well as "the."
    No, not wrong. "...a stripper pole" would have worked as well.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Well, I don't know, I thought women's underwear is more specific and mostly refers to panties, while "undergarments" is more general.
    From Oxford Dictionaries:
    Underwear = Clothing worn under other clothes, typically next to the skin
    Underclothing = Clothing worn under other clothes, typically next to the skin
    Undergarment = an item of underclothing

    "Flat as a pancake" is a terrible exaggeration. It's pretty much a flat joke as it is, and it would survive intact with "a" as well as "the."
    If you say so. But needless to say, I completely disagree.
     
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