British date versus American date

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MyUserName

Senior Member
Portuguese
"On 1 June an Air France Airbus 330 travelling from Rio de Janeiro to Paris plunged into the Atlantic, killing all 228 people on board."

Hi,
The sentence above was extracted from a British newspaper. I noticed the date is written differently from the American way. How is it spoken, please? "First, June"? "One, June"?
Thanks.
 
  • Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    "On the first of June".

    We also write 1/6/2009 to mean the first of June 2009:cool:
     

    Alxmrphi

    Senior Member
    UK English
    "On 1 June an Air France Airbus 330 travelling from Rio de Janeiro to Paris plunged into the Atlantic, killing all 228 people on board."

    Hi,
    The sentence above was extracted from a British newspaper. I noticed the date is written differently from the American way. How is it spoken, please? "First, June"? "One, June"?
    Thanks.
    We write it like that in BE but, at least in my experience, we say "On the first of June", we send letters out in work and receive them and that's how I read it, I usually include "st / th / rd" after my ordinal numbers though, not everyone does, but when speaking I always say "the <number> <st/th/rd>"

    [Edit] : Like Loob said, that's how we write the same date, in AE that means the 6th of January 2009. Whenever I'm reading things online, I hope that the first portion is above 12 so then I instantly know it's BE usage, otherwise I have to look for other clues to decipher it.
     

    MyUserName

    Senior Member
    Portuguese
    We write it like that in BE but, at least in my experience, we say "On the first of June", we send letters out in work and receive them and that's how I read it, I usually include "st / th / rd" after my ordinal numbers though, not everyone does, but when speaking I always say "the <number> <st/th/rd>"

    [Edit] : Like Loob said, that's how we write the same date, in AE that means the 6th of January 2009. Whenever I'm reading things online, I hope that the first portion is above 12 so then I instantly know it's BE usage, otherwise I have to look for other clues to decipher it.
    I agree!
    Some times it's very difficult to be sure whether the date is in the American format or in the "world" format.
    Thanks.
     

    Hitchhiker

    Senior Member
    English-US
    I think it's a newspaper short form of the date to save print and space. I have seen in British magazines the date written as "1st June" which in America would be read as "the first of June". In American writing it would be written "June 1st" but Americans often say "the first of June" when speaking and "June first" is also used when speaking.
     

    Cypherpunk

    Senior Member
    US, English
    I always get dates backwards, here. One secretary always complains that I don't do dates 'right'. I prefer the military version: 01JUN09. There is no confusion, and the Spanish speakers I always deal with understand with no problem.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    But even that (01JUN09) has ambiguity potential :( (as June the 9th, 2001 if you didn't know whose system was being used and had to guess!). Before the turn of the millennium either 99Jun09 or 09JUN99 would have been unambiguous.

    The only system for dates that is consistent with how we write numbers is 2009:06:01:13:45 as representing 15 minutes before 2 p.m. on said date. From left to right, the units of time get smaller and smaller, just as numbers do. However, just because it's logical doesn't mean it will become acceptable!
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Credit cards often use abbreviated dates (ie just month and year) - which I thought was unambiguous, until I wrote 'Oct 09' and someone interpreted it as '9th Oct'!

    Back to the original question: I'd always say 'On the first of June'.
     
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