broth/stock

Discussion in 'English Only' started by María Madrid, Aug 22, 2006.

  1. María Madrid

    María Madrid Banned

    Madrid, Spain
    Spanish Spain
    Could you please explain the difference (if any) between broth and stock? Thank you! :)
     
  2. TrentinaNE

    TrentinaNE Senior Member

    USA
    English (American)
    They are generally interchangeable in AE. Some cookbooks might specify a slight difference but I'm not aware of any. I think the word stock is used more often when referring to an ingredient for cooking something else (e.g., you might use chicken stock in preparing risotto), while broth is used to indicate the liquid you eat (e.g., a restaurant menu might include tortellini in broth).

    Elisabetta
     
  3. María Madrid

    María Madrid Banned

    Madrid, Spain
    Spanish Spain
    I understand, Thank you very much Elisabetta! :)
     
  4. TrentinaNE

    TrentinaNE Senior Member

    USA
    English (American)
    You're welcome, Maria. But wait for some other cooks to give their views. ;)

    Elisabetta
     
  5. ewhite

    ewhite Senior Member

    USA/English
    According to the website of the Food Network:

    And quite a nice chicken stock one can make with a load of bones, some onions, carrots, celery, and six hours of very slow cooking.
     
  6. mamboney

    mamboney Senior Member

    Rocky Mountains
    English (USA)
    In my opinion, they are mostly interchangeable. They do have subtle differences between them in some cases, however.

    They have the same meaning for cooking - broth and stock are indeed interchangeable terms. For instance, to make chicken stock you would take a chicken carcass, some vegetables and herbs of your choosing, cover with water & simmer. After a while you would remove all herbs, veggies & chicken parts from the now flavorful water (stock) & use as a base for a sauce or something tasty. If I am too lazy to make my own stock (say for using in a risotto recipe) then I would buy my stock at the market. Interestingly, the can would be labelled as "Chicken Broth", not stock. But they are the same thing.

    In a restaurant however, a menu would list Chicken Broth as a choice, but not Chicken Stock. I guess that the differentiation would be that Broth is something that can be eaten alone (as a boring, bland meal) while Chicken Stock is something that you cook with.

    Hopefully this helped you.
     
  7. María Madrid

    María Madrid Banned

    Madrid, Spain
    Spanish Spain
    Thanks! I understand it all right now. Broth served alone would be something like consommé (which I don't find boring, btw!!!). Thank you all so much! :)
     
  8. panjandrum

    panjandrum Occasional Moderator

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    This looks like another AE/BE difference.

    There is no way that broth and stock could be confused - at least, not in Scotland or Ireland. I can't speak for all of the BE world.

    Stock is thin, runny liquid stuff with no bits in.

    Broth is stock with lots of vegetables and possibly even some meat.

    Broth - either Scotch Broth or Vegetable Broth is an incredibly flavoursome thing that wants only a few potatoes or a generous helping of good wheaten bread to make a meal in its own right. It is definitely not boring or bland.
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2011
  9. . 1 Banned

    Ferntree Gully
    Australian Australia
    My understanding is that a broth is a dish prepared for consuming as is and that a stock is an ingredient to be added to other things to then be consumed.

    .,,
     
  10. mamboney

    mamboney Senior Member

    Rocky Mountains
    English (USA)
    Nice pictures! They sure do look tastier than what I would associate with broth. Yum!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 28, 2011
  11. TrentinaNE

    TrentinaNE Senior Member

    USA
    English (American)
    I agree, those are nice photos. They look yummy. But they're not what we'd call broth in AE. Broth is a liquid with no discernable "bits" in it. The "bits" would make it soup on this side of the pond. :)

    Elisabetta
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 28, 2011
  12. FloppingDonkey New Member

    Russian - Moscow, Russia
    "How to make chicken stock"

    I've never heard of stock before, and when I searched online, it came up as something that "forms the basis of broth".

    I've always thought soup was based on broth or bouillon, and I am not sure how stock fits in. Can you please help me here?
     
  13. Tunalagatta Senior Member

    English - England
    You obtain chicken stock by boiling the carcass of a chicken in water along with onion, carrot and celery, then passing the liquid through a sieve. I think it's often synonymous with 'broth'. However, sometimes 'broth' is used to mean a more abundant kind of soup with added ingredients (beans, vegetables etc).

    You can buy ready-made stock cubes if you don't have the time or resources to make your own stock.
     
  14. natkretep

    natkretep Moderato con anima (English Only)

    Singapore
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    <<Moderator note: I have merged the thread started by FloppingDonkey with an earlier thread on the same question, which has addressed the difference between stock and broth in some detail.>>

    Welcome to the forum, FloppingDonkey! :)
     
  15. JamesM

    JamesM Senior Member

    It sounds like it is a difference. Broth, to me, would essentially be consommé. It wouldn't have any vegetables or meat in it. If you added vegetables to broth I would call it vegetable soup. If you added meat to it, I would call it whatever meat had been added: chicken soup; beef and vegetable soup;...
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 28, 2011
  16. Cagey post mod (English Only / Latin)

    California
    English - US
    A specific exception to the American use of 'broth': we do know "Scotch Broth" as a soup containing vegetables and meat.

    Andy Warhol's famous painting of a can of this 'hearty soup'.

    (Otherwise, I agree that broth is the liquid part of a soup, or the a clear liquid soup alone.)
     
  17. JamesM

    JamesM Senior Member

    This is true. :) However, if someone said to me, "You're not feeling well. Let me heat you up a little chicken broth" I would expect to get a cup of (basically) clear liquid.
     
  18. Tunalagatta Senior Member

    English - England
    Regarding FloppingDonkey's question, we can take it that the writer's conception of 'broth' is that of a more hearty soup, and that 'stock' is the liquid part, so they are more likely to be British/Irish than from the USA (although I agree with James' example of 'medicinal broth' being a clear liquid).

    I think that the term 'broth' on its own has evolved in BE to mean 'broth + extra ingredients', although I can't remember how you describe that linguistic progress. Can anyone remind me what it is?!
     
  19. FloppingDonkey New Member

    Russian - Moscow, Russia
    Thank you-all for your answers. I just made some (broth also known as stock). :)
     
  20. JamesM

    JamesM Senior Member

    This is slightly off-topic but it might help me understand the definition of "broth" better. What is the difference, then, between "broth" and "soup"?
     
  21. Tunalagatta Senior Member

    English - England

    That's a good question!

    I can only speak from a personal point of view, but I'd say that broth is a kind of hybrid, throw-anything-and-everything-in kind of dish, probably with fish/meat, pulses, vegetables and potatoes all floating around in it (I would also call this 'Everything soup'.).

    Soup
    on the other hand has one or two defining ingredients (for example tomato, chicken and leek). And only a soup can be liquidized, not a broth (but a soup can also have whole pieces of vegetables and meat).
     
  22. panjandrum

    panjandrum Occasional Moderator

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    The OED definition does it very nicely:
    The liquid in which anything has been boiled, and which is impregnated with its juice; a decoction; esp. that in which meat is boiled or macerated; also a thin soup made from this with the addition of vegetables, pearl barley, rice, etc., as Scottish ‘broth’.

    If you blitz the broth you get soup :)
     
  23. JamesM

    JamesM Senior Member

    Blitz? Sorry, I don't understand that part, panjandrum.
     
  24. panjandrum

    panjandrum Occasional Moderator

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Oops - it's standard parlance in various foodie contexts here.
    Blitz = blend or liquidise.
     
  25. JamesM

    JamesM Senior Member

    So if it's not blended (what I would call "creamed" or "pureed") it's not soup? That is quite a difference in the meaning of the words "broth" and "soup".
     
  26. panjandrum

    panjandrum Occasional Moderator

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    No, not at all.
    But if it IS blended, it is not broth.
    For me, the essence of broth is meaty stock plus floating vegetable bits and some kind of filler such as barley or potato. If there happen to be hidden pieces of meat, all the better.
    It may be heresy, but for me, broth is a subset of soup.
     

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