bruise v. brush v. crush [feelings]

hhtt

Senior Member
Turkish
Context and Situation: To bruise one's feelings. In an office a secretary spilled the coffee on to the papers and then her boss got angry. He yelled her in an abasing manner.

Example 1: Her boss yelled her and bruise her feelings.

Instead of the original which of the following is correct and idiomatic?

1) Her boss yelled her and brushed her feelings.

2) Her boss yelled her and crushed her feelings.

Source:
Newbury House and self-made.

Thank you.
 
  • pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    First note: you want "yelled at her."

    1) is not something we would say. "Brushed her feelings" is meaningless to me.

    2) is correct, but "crushing" feelings is much worse than 'bruising" them. Using "bruised" sounds like she is overly sensitive; using "crushed" sounds like the boss is an ass. (Think of your arm being crushed vs. being bruised in an accident.)
     

    hhtt

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    What do you think about "to devastate one's feelings" for this context?

    Thank you.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    He could devastate her, but not her feelings. Her boss yelled at her and she was devastated. Note that this means she is completely destroyed (emotionally). You might say this if your family was killed not if someone criticized you.
    Bruised is less than crushed is less than devastated.
     

    hhtt

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    He could devastate her, but not her feelings. Her boss yelled at her and she was devastated. Note that this means she is completely destroyed (emotionally). You might say this if your family was killed not if someone criticized you.
    Bruised is less than crushed is less than devastated.
    I.e the strongest is devastate than crush, then is bruise.

    Thank you.
     
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